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I might be showing my natural cynicism, but how come every Mk VI for sale is a "killer" horn, a "players" horn, amazing player etc.? Bearing in mind it appears that the consensus is that there are generally some less than great VI's out there, how come there are never any of these for sale? It's irrelevant to me, as prices are at a level that I would never pay, even if I had the money. I wonder how many are so desperate to own one that they buy unplayed, and are disappointed. I have no wish to cause offence to any owners, but how refreshing it would be to read a for sale ad which described a horn as being honestly not that great, and at a price which reflected that. Maybe any VI can be made great by a skilled tech? Let the debate begin 😀!
 

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Expectation bias goes a long way. I sold a 30's large chamber mouthpiece on ebay recenty for 90$. The buyer who is a mouthpiece flipper, paired that piece with an old ligature and cap and described it as "plays like a really good slant Link" and sold it for $180.
 

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Well, it means that you just need a different language as soon as the old one is getting less effective. As soon as everyone is used to a "killer horn" being a usual one that isn't very special, you must sell a "murderer horn" or a "warhead horn" or anything comparable in terms like that. Finally, when these are becoming weak again, you'll have to insult your potential buyer to get the attention that you and your horn deserve. You'll be selling a "You're-an-idiot-horn" or something even more powerful then.

My "Get-off-you-jerk-10m" I'm owning is not for sale by the way.
 

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Being someone who admittedly uses the term “players horn” when listing certain horns, I have to say that I think it’s a very effective way to quickly describe a horn to prospective buyers. Especially when you are counting on potential buyers to click on your ad based on a one-sentence thread link, you need to find a way to describe a horn that: has been played for many years and has standard playing wear, may have repairs or previous damage, may need a bit of work to be in top playing condition,etc. - I find that calling something a “player’s horn” is a perfect way to say all of that and more in only 2 words.
And you are right, it is hard to justify calling something “killer” when it’s totally subjective to the seller’s opinion, however I admit that when I call something a killer horn, I really truly think it is a horn that plays phenomenally well. No seller would admit to a horn that doesn’t play well for them, but I would assume that most of them would be very happy to admit if they think one specific horn is a unique and special player in their eyes. People have been buying horns for decades without seeing them in person, and I don’t expect that to change at any point soon!
Hope that helps
 

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Another point - you have to realize that probably 100-200 posts are made on this forum every single day, so you need to be making a thread starter that is 1. Honest and true to what you are selling, and 2. Intrigues the viewer into clicking on it and possibly making the sale. For people who are not a big shop and don’t have a renowned storefront, you need to grab the attention of potential buyers and listing something as “Selmer Mark VI tenor” may not do that and you may be sitting on it for quite a long time. But by adding descriptors such as “Origianl lacquer, overhauled, players horn, fantastic player”, you maybe catch the eye of many more people. It’s hard to describe this in writing but I’m my eyes it’s the only effective way to honestly and truly market your goods to the public and make the sale.
 

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"Player's horn"

Being someone who admittedly uses the term "players horn" when listing certain horns, I have to say that I think it's a very effective way to quickly describe a horn to prospective buyers. Especially when you are counting on potential buyers to click on your ad based on a one-sentence thread link, you need to find a way to describe a horn that: has been played for many years and has standard playing wear, may have repairs or previous damage, may need a bit of work to be in top playing condition,etc. - I find that calling something a "player's horn" is a perfect way to say all of that and more in only 2 words.
I hope you include that specificity if appropriate. I understand the term "player's horn" to indicate a horn that may not be collectible for all the reasons you cite, but that it is in top playing condition, hence well suited to someone looking for a horn that is to play rather than flip or hoard.
 

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Re: "Player's horn"

I hope you include that specificity if appropriate. I understand the term "player's horn" to indicate a horn that may not be collectible for all the reasons you cite, but that it is in top playing condition, hence well suited to someone looking for a horn that is to play rather than flip or hoard.
I can assure you, I always am honest in that regard. If a horn is playing perfectly top to bottom and will need no work done whatsoever, I will specify that. If it plays top to bottom but may need some work done in the near future, or, if it is not playing and needs work done to play top to bottom, I will always include that in the listing and price accordingly. Whether all other sellers follow these honest and proper listing practices, well I definitely can't say that for sure...
 

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Player's horn = Been beat to hell and back, resoldered keys, but I want you to pay a 20% premium for the beater.
Killer horn = It's such an amazing horn but I still found a better one. You will too eventually.
 

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I don't know that there is a "standard" lingo, but being in the saxophone business has led me to understand the terms this way.

1) collectors horn - the top 5% of horns that have no repair history or possibly a very minor one. Has 95+% lacquer and possibly (hopefully) all the original pads, resonators and adjustment material. Original case is a must too.

2) players horn - one that won't appeal to collectors, but hasn't been trashed. It may have some repairs, but nothing major. It's probably been owned by someone that wasn't a road musician or rough on their gear, but did play it quite regularly. When overhauled and setup correctly, they are a safe bet to be very solid players.

3) beater horns- one that has just been through it all. Lots and lots of past repairs that can include dent work, patches, broken keys, poor repairs, severely bent, cracked tone holes and the list goes on and on. Not to say that these can't be great players, but they take a TON of work to get right.

So from the standpoint of players horn vs killer horn, I believe the term players horn is misrepresented or misinterpreted by many.

Killer is definitely subjective, but makes for nice advertising!

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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3) beater horns- one that has just been through it all. Lots and lots of past repairs that can include dent work, patches, broken keys, poor repairs, severely bent, cracked tone holes and the list goes on and on. Not to say that these can't be great players, but they take a TON of work to get right.
Nobody would ever list their Mark VI as a "beater" though. Ebay logic says the horn has been through countless repairs because it's that great of a player.
 
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