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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I´ve tried the ATM350U clip on mic and also the Audix ADX20 i-p.
The sound was great but I play a Keilwerth SX90R and the noise of the keys on the mic was kind of annoying.
I think this is because of the rolled tone holes.
Is there a clip on mic which isolates better and has a very good sound quality?
Thanks.
Regards from south Germany.
 

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clip microphones suffer a lot from transmitting the vibrations creasted by the keys closing. They are of course connected to the body of the saxophone which, is hit repeatedly ( whether this is on rolled or straight toneholes is not important) by a flat surface impacting the body itself. How could this not produce noise?

As Others have suggested , cushioning the clamp would normally produce less such a problem but to so extent will always be there, just subdued. Another way to deal with this is to have an elastic mount of the microphone itself.

I think this is one of the most common reasons why people have abandoned the mount on body and bell in favor of external microphones.

SD systems uses all manners of cradles to isolate the microphone form its mount but still ( I think) the sound of the is audible if the volume is not overwhelming it.

http://www.bill-lewington.com/sdsys.htm



Suprisingly some folks are now trying somehting that was tried before and that is to build a piezoelectric pick up either in the mouthpiece or the neck ( the first being a less intrusive way to do this).

This completely different approach was discarded by many after its introduction in the '60 '70 with the many systems like Varitone, Octavoice and so forth.

If you watch this video you can hear its application and the near total absence of key sound , the sound is rather bright though but not all the mikes are the same, the P7 sounds very much better than the other ones.

 

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Try a Keene Clamp and a Shure SM57.
Good luck trying to find one. They've been discontinued for a number of years and I have not seen them turn up on the online auction sites ever. I saw one rock and roll tenor player with one about a year/year and a half ago. Haven't seen any since or before in the wild.
 

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Also, if your horn is making a lot of key noise, it might need to go to the shop and get some of the bearing and rods lubed and worked on.
Yes - excessive clicking is usually because you've lost a felt or cork - You should hear pads thump closed, but not clicking. IF you're playing with a band, or any type of background music, it shouldn't be a problem. The music will mask the key noise. Assuming you play in time, anything that can be heard might even enhance the music. I've recorded quite a bit of live sax with an ATM 350 clip-on with no real issues. If you're trying to record "studio style", a stand mounted mic is more appropriate, but live stuff comes out just fine with clip-on's....

I used to really obsess over extraneous noises in recordings. I did a lot of audio engineering in the 80's when everything was expected to be totally sterile. Much of my time on every session for a while was spent carving out the vocalist's breaths between words, and removing clicks, pops, hums etc., that usually no one could even hear unless I solo'd the track and pointed it out. Nuts.

These days I appreciate the organic sound of pads sealing, vocalist breathing etc... Music is supposed to be somehow alive, and those sounds are as much a part of it as anything else. Besides - Great music can't be hurt much by a mediocre recording. The good stuff shines through, no matter what. On the flip side you can polish a bad song until it gleams and it's still just a crappy piece of music.
 

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Yes - excessive clicking is usually because you've lost a felt or cork - You should hear pads thump closed, but not clicking.
... and clicking and thumping are in two different frequency domains.

IF you're playing with a band, or any type of background music, it shouldn't be a problem. The music will mask the key noise. Assuming you play in time, anything that can be heard might even enhance the music.
Indeed, key click was added to the Hammond B organs.

These days I appreciate the organic sound of pads sealing, vocalist breathing etc... Music is supposed to be somehow alive, and those sounds are as much a part of it as anything else. Besides - Great music can't be hurt much by a mediocre recording. The good stuff shines through, no matter what. On the flip side you can polish a bad song until it gleams and it's still just a crappy piece of music.
Amen. I still remember several Blue Note recordings with squeaky high hats and bass drum pedals. But the MUSIC was oh, so good. Apparently the recording engineers thought it was acceptable too - I cannot imagine that they failed to hear it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Fader: I totally agree. I am getting obsessed with details that nobody will notice and the other instrument will cover.
This pickup? I don´t get it? How can I mount it on my Durga 3? Can I do it? Should I drill the mpc? Oh my God!
Of all the "Clip on" mics for saxophone?
Which could be the most natural sounding mic?
Thanks again for all the feedback.
Cheers
 

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Try the Shure PGA98H-TQG, it is less expensive than the WB98H/C and sounds a lot better. Otherwise, clean the salt off your pads and soften them with mink oil or clear shoe polish and also make sure that the felts and corks are in place and that the the action is well lubed. That should take care of most of the noise, if you have to press really hard to play, you may need some adjustment to allow for less force. Should all be really easy. Now, I hope you don't have any resonators hitting the tone holes :)
 

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microphones picking up key noise is not a new thing and given the large amount of threads dedicated to this issue it would be impossible that all the people experiencing this don't oil the action or need to soften the pads.

Just a few

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?1271-Trouble-with-key-noise-in-mic
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...ne-picking-up-the-action-of-the-rods-and-keys
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?135952-Brainstom-on-modifying-my-AKG-microphone
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?10189-Recording-Tips
 

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I'm going to do what I got banned for in another forum and recommend something that doesn't specifically answer the question but might solve the problem:

Shure 57 or 58 on a microphone stand...

(Duck! And cover...)
 

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A forum is a discussion platform and discussing implies the possibility of deviation from the initial thread.

Having said that, I agree, the only real way to reduce the sound of the mechanical closing of the keys is to not connect the microphone to the saxophone. Yet there are then many other limitations, a microphone on a stand limits you to play close and in line with the microphone and the sound of the saxophone comes from different places on the horn.

Like most thing in life things come in a mixed bag, something will be good and some will be bad.
 
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