Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've had key oil in my cleaning kit for as long as I've had a sax (about 15 years). I'm sure I must've learned how to use it at some point during grade school but for the life of me I can't remember how, or even when the last time was I did use it. Can anyone help? :scratch:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
That shwoodwind site is exactly what I needed thanks! My horn has been in the shop quite a few times. One time because the little nubbin on my neck fell off and had to get soldered back on. Also for air leaks and to fix dents. So maybe the repair guy did oil the keys. Not sure. I just felt like I was being neglectful somehow with the oil. Glad I know what to do now. Thanks again.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,336 Posts
+1 for the Music Medic synthetic key oil and pivot and roller lubricant. The oil comes in a small needle applicator that is just the right size, and the "lube" comes in a handy syringe.

I am not a big fan of oiling the keys on the instrument because on the keys with long rods the oil rarely "wicks" to the center of the key where it is needed, and because it is very easy to get too much oil which runs down the post and onto the saxophone.

If a player is comfortable doing so, I recommend taking the keys off one at a time. Then you run a cotton pipe cleaner through the tubing to remove the old oil and wipe the rod with a clean cloth or paper towel. The next step is to add a drop of oil at the entrance to the hinge tube that you are going to insert the rod when the key goes back on and reinstall the key(s). One can learn to be comfortable with this method by starting with the palm keys, and side keys, and then graduate to the keys that are together on the stacks.

For the keys that are held in place by pivot screws, you remove the key (keeping the screws in the post) and clean the ends with the tip of the cotton pipe cleaner. Then you press a tiny dab of the lubricant into the holes on the ends with your fingertip, and then reattach the key. For rollers, remove the roller, clean the inside with the pipe cleaner and press a dab of lubricant into the hole, and reattach.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
If you do decide to oil the keywork yourself, only apply ONE drop of oil to the ends of the key barrels where they meet the pillars or an adjacent key barrel on the same rod (eg. LH and RH main action) as well as a single drop at both ends of the rollers. Don't overdo it as you will end up contaminating key corks/felts and they will either become sticky or drop off, so only do this evey month on an instrument played regularly not only to prevent the keys becoming noisy, but also to prevent wear and corrosion.

You can use a much thicker (higher viscosity) oil on linkages such as the side Bb and C forks that link to their respective pad cup arms (usually covered with plastic tubing) to reduce mechanical noise, as well as the ends and fulcrum of the 8ve mechanism rocker - but only apply a small amount of oil to these.

Use a needle and dip the point in the bottle to collect a small amount of oil (wait until it stops dripping off the needle first) and apply it directly to the linkages as you will have more control over it this way rather than straight from the bottle.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top