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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody know who makes the Kessler Custom mouthpieces for them? I’ll assume they don’t have a mouthpiece manufacturing shop in their back room.
I just grabbed one off eBay marked 7+2 which is I guess means 7**.
I liked the look of the baffle and chamber and took a chance, at $65, to try it.
it plays surprisingly better than a lot of things I’ve tried that are five times the price.
‘it’s not important, but I just wondered where they outsource their stuff from. Somebody who works at Kessler knows their ****.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If they are made in Asia, as his saxes are, I’d venture to guess the Kessler is a decent sax.
I’ll try emailing him.
As I said, it’s not important but it plays really well and I figured a 7** is kind of a recent thing that was probably a special order.
 

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Wow, taking me back a while, iirc, from the wayback machine, I had Kessler's OL 50 mouthpiece come with my Kessler tenor and Dave said they were Babbit blanks with some hand finish fine tuning by someone at Kessler's .
But do call or email to verify the provenance. While I've migrated to metal mouthpieces, I still have the Kessler mpc in my small stable of mpcs...
 

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I used to have a Kessler soprano mouthpiece years ago for a short time and I remember it was engraved "made in USA". My memory could be wrong on this.....
 

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I use a Kessler Custom Modern Classical baritone mouthpiece, and it's quite satisfactory. Nicely finished. I bought it because, frankly, it was available at a discount when buying a bari from them. I wanted a quality, middle-of-the-road classical piece, and that's exactly what I got, and at a low price to boot.
 

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I received a Kessler NY alto piece with a horn I purchased a few years ago and I was surprised at how well it played. It played better than most of my much more expensive alto mouthpieces. I still use it as a back up to my Ted Klum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I received a Kessler NY alto piece with a horn I purchased a few years ago and I was surprised at how well it played. It played better than most of my much more expensive alto mouthpieces. I still use it as a back up to my Ted Klum.
The tenor piece plays a lot better than the one Klum I tried. I’ll never buy one of those again.
‘Severely overpriced for a dull mouthpiece.
 

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The tenor piece plays a lot better than the one Klum I tried. I’ll never buy one of those again.
‘Severely overpriced for a dull mouthpiece.
Interesting. Come to think of it, the Klum is my main piece because it's a little "dull". On alto, for solo work I like a dry, without dark or bright coming through at all and I can imagine that a lot of people might think of it as dull. I like that it can be pushed to do whatever I want but if I lay back, it is kind of dull or extremely dry. Kind of like a Konitz sound with less wobble. LOL.
I've never tried a Klum tenor.
 

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Anybody know who makes the Kessler Custom mouthpieces for them? I’ll assume they don’t have a mouthpiece manufacturing shop in their back room.
I just grabbed one off eBay marked 7+2 which is I guess means 7**.
I liked the look of the baffle and chamber and took a chance, at $65, to try it.
it plays surprisingly better than a lot of things I’ve tried that are five times the price.
‘it’s not important, but I just wondered where they outsource their stuff from. Somebody who works at Kessler knows their ****.
These are well made generic blanks from JJ Babbitt. Good stuff
 

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Do not know who faces them. There is a local player that has been playing on a Kessler tenor piece for years that he prefers over his valuable HR Slant Sig Link he has had for 35+ years and he sounds fantastic on it. Beautiful fat, warm tone with a little edge.
 

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Do not know who faces them. There is a local player that has been playing on a Kessler tenor piece for years that he prefers over his valuable HR Slant Sig Link he has had for 35+ years and he sounds fantastic on it. Beautiful fat, warm tone with a little edge.
[/QUOT
This work is done at the factory at JJ Babbitt. They have a machine that applies a facing curve and finishers that detail the tip and baffle area. Very good value.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Here’s the reply I got from them. I can’t believe i can play a 9! It sure doesn’t look or feel that open


The 7+2 was a model that we opened up to about a .120" tip opening (a 9 = "7+2").

The blanks are molded by Babbitt for us using one of their standard rubber cores. However, we designed a custom facing cam with them many years back to be our standard "OL7 Pro" facing at a .100". So the blank is our own unique blank. We then do the hand facing on the blank here in store.

We do not offer the larger tip opening option any longer (time issue more than anything) so we only have the standard .100" OL7 facing on that model as an option. “
 

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Here’s the reply I got from them. I can’t believe i can play a 9! It sure doesn’t look or feel that open


The 7+2 was a model that we opened up to about a .120" tip opening (a 9 = "7+2").

The blanks are molded by Babbitt for us using one of their standard rubber cores. However, we designed a custom facing cam with them many years back to be our standard "OL7 Pro" facing at a .100". So the blank is our own unique blank. We then do the hand facing on the blank here in store.

We do not offer the larger tip opening option any longer (time issue more than anything) so we only have the standard .100" OL7 facing on that model as an option. “
that's very good info. having their own custom cam was a smart move with some finishing in house to get it right. Tip size is only one design element that contributes to how well a piece can perform. Babbitt's been at it for well over a hundred years and many of their designs are still the benchmark for saxophonists everywhere.
 

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I think you should get it refaced to your usual .090 or .095 and let us know how it works out. You could do this and still pay far less (total) than you would for many of the other pieces on the market. Is it even possible to change a tip opening that much?
 

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I think you should get it refaced to your usual .090 or .095 and let us know how it works out. You could do this and still pay far less (total) than you would for many of the other pieces on the market. Is it even possible to change a tip opening that much?
But why? He said it played well at the .120 opening and its a rarer version that has such a huge opening. If he were to have one closed, wouldn't it be better to get one of the regular 7s?

However, I've seen openings changed more than that before.
 

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This was mostly tongue-in-cheek. I know the OP prefers smaller facings, and if he gets this closed down, then maybe I get the benefit of knowing the results of his experience without doing the work ;)

It would make more sense to get another in the standard .100 facing and then close that down. That could still be less expensive than many of the other options the OP refers to.
 
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