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Forum Contributor 2016, The official SOTW Little S
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5,472 Posts
When you are done, make sure you take them off the mouthpiece and put it in a reedguard. If they still are dirty when you do this everytime, it is time to throw it away.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
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2,487 Posts
i soak them in listerene to break them in and once or twice when they get mucky, it kills the bacteria, stops bacteria and other crud going down the sax, tastes ok, and seems to make the reeds perform better
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2010
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3,310 Posts
Matt C said:
I have problems keeping my reeds clean, any suggestions
My suggestion is don't worry about it? unless its going in some other unclean environment other than your mouth..in which case stop doing that!

Seriously, for the length of time a reed lasts, what are you worried about. Wipe it down, stick it in a reed case till you use it again. You aren't going to catch anything you don't already have.

FWIW, Listerine is full of Alcohol, which I expect wont do anything for the longevity and humidity level of a reed.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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32,938 Posts
Dilute hydrogen peroxide works well.
 

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Matt C said:
I have problems keeping my reeds clean, any suggestions
You can wash reeds with plain old soap and water. The fibres become clogged after a while. I sometimes give them a gentle scrub with an old toothbrush, warm water and soap. Pay attention to the back of the reed. Can sometimes bring 'em back to life for a while.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2014
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26,341 Posts
I just stick mine under the faucet and rub the funky slime off with my thumb and forefinger and water. Do this after everytime you play, then put it in a special reed case[as opposed to keeping it on the mpc or sleeve it came in].
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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7,430 Posts
Use drugstore hydrogen peroxide and a soft toothbrush to clean them every few uses. Clean the Reedguard every so often, too. The clamps are removable for cleaning.
jazzbluescat; I like your avatar. Believe it or not, in the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, there is a wall of Egyptian hieroglyphs containing a perfect likeness of Alfred E. Nuemann. The first time I saw it I thought some idiot had defaced the exhibit, but it's real. The next time I go, I'll take a picture of it. The darndest thing I ever saw.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
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5,528 Posts
Clean reeds? Why?

The best reeds I've every played were medium to dark brown with black specks and green or black on the under side. Just re-wet with your mouth, wipe it on your jeans and you are ready to play.
 
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