Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
8,458 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just pulled the trigger on a SML RevD tenor.
I have a gold medal stencil alto as well as a rev A alto.
They’re both great sounding horns with some real character and very good intonation.
I’m sure the tenors are just as good, but are they similar in tone character or completely different.
I’ve only played a very early Rev A/ Rev B model tenor a few years ago and found it very similar (tone wise) to my Selmer Super Series tenor.
Perhaps a little more spread.
Either way I know I’m going to get a good quality horn if the altos are anything to go by.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,589 Posts
Nick - yoozz gonna' be one happy lad :cool: and meez' already jealous.
 
  • Like
Reactions: B Flat

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,156 Posts
The only horn I’ve ever parted with and regretted the decision was a 1956 Rev D Tenor. I now play a Rev C Tenor. They are the real sleepers of the horn world. Complex and dark sounding with a beautiful singing upper register. Worth the time and money to set up properly. Congratulations.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
8,458 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The only horn I’ve ever parted with and regretted the decision was a 1956 Rev D Tenor. I now play a Rev C Tenor. They are the real sleepers of the horn world. Complex and dark sounding with a beautiful singing upper register. Worth the time and money to set up properly. Congratulations.
Now that’s the kinda stuff I like hearing.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
13,422 Posts
Enjoy your awesome new toy but keep your hands out of the way of slamming iron.

I hope you are healing up ok so you can really enjoy the new horn.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
8,458 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Enjoy your awesome new toy but keep your hands out of the way of slamming iron.

I hope you are healing up ok so you can really enjoy the new horn.
Yeah the hand is getting a lot better now.
Still sore at times but definitely improving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,589 Posts
If my memory serves me correctly - local (to Melbourne) woodwind technician Ian Gordon laments leaving behind his SML and Cousenon tenors when he migrated from England to here. For those who don't know - Ian intends to retire this year. Personally I cannot fathom the concept of leaving either behind. And.....Ian's retirement will most definately be a loss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
The tone quality is similar to an SBA. Maybe not as much projection as the SBA. I sat and listened to very good player test run both my SBA & Rev D back and forth. They were super similar out the front of the horn when listening. From behind playing, it’s a completely different experience. And as we are aware, both top of the line French vintage horns. You won’t be disappointed in the overall sound quality. One thing is that the altissimo on some are a little clunky compared to the SBA altissimo experience. Having said that, the SBA altissimo experience has got to be the best out there. The core sound of my Rev D is very sweet. If you like sweet you won’t be sorry you bought this Rev D. Beautiful sounding horns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
I've owned nice tenor examples of both the Rev. D and Gold Medal I. Tone-wise, the GM1 remains my favorite tenor I've played in 20+ years and an embarrassing amount of different horns. Something about it; the perfect marriage of Selmer and Conn, to my ears. I sold the GM1 with great hesitation even after the right buyer came along. It was a very heavy horn and altissimo was stubbornly difficult. I suggest you look up a couple of the SML altissimo fingering charts floating around SOTW and experiment.

The Rev. D was very similar to the GM1 in terms of tone but maybe a smidge more focused and compact. Both were very good horns, and you're sure to be pleased with yours. SML's quality was simply top-notch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I have just been playing my Rev D tenor for a few hours today. When I started blowing, I noticed something about the horn was not quite 💯 %,
so I checked all the usual trouble making culprits. You guessed it, the octave leaver spring was really light creating a significant leak from the octave venting hole. Neck corks, octave springs, octave pads and neck to body tenons just have to be perfect. Then there is the rest of the horn of course. So I adjusted the spring tension and Voila. Wow didn’t that make a difference. From splatty thin sounding to warm and connected.

Any way my friends, these horns are real, real good to say the least. I was play swapping between my 1964 VI, 1948 SBA & the SML Rev D. And you know what? I’m going with the Rev D for a while. The two Selmers can have a rest for the time being.

Who would have thought. The SML has such a sweetness to it. Oh yeah and for what it’s worth the bore and bell size is a considerable amount larger than both the Selmers bore and bell sizes.

As I mentioned earlier in a prior post in this thread, the Rev D is closer in sound to the Coltane SBA than say a modern Series IIII Selmer. If that’s the sound you are going for, which today I was, then these horns are well worth considering as an option. They are really a great buy and way less on the pocket than an SBA.

I played the horns with a no USA no.4 Florida Link. Helped put the horn right in the ballpark of the Coltranesque sound on the Cresent recording. Which I have been continuously listening to all of this week. And believe me, close lays give a great tight focused sound. If you want a great tight focused sound with great intonation, then consider smaller lay Florida Link. Don’t get it refaced, just work out how to play it and what it’s wanting from you so that it can sing. And they really can sing.

The Rev D intonation is real real good. Better than the SBA. Excellent intonation on the SML. The one I own is mint and in great playing condition. Not sure how the tension on the octave spring became so light. Any way it’s fixed now and the sax blows very well, top to bottom. When I purchased it, the horn was given considerable bench time to get it happening. Cause it just wasn’t at the time of the purchase.

The Rev D is right, right up there with the best of them. Truely a great great piece of engineering. And truely a wonderful musical instrument letting you create the sounds that you long to hear.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,106 Posts
So I just pulled the trigger on a SML RevD tenor.
I have a gold medal stencil alto as well as a rev A alto.
They’re both great sounding horns with some real character and very good intonation.
I’m sure the tenors are just as good, but are they similar in tone character or completely different.
I’ve only played a very early Rev A/ Rev B model tenor a few years ago and found it very similar (tone wise) to my Selmer Super Series tenor.
Perhaps a little more spread.
Either way I know I’m going to get a good quality horn if the altos are anything to go by.
Not fair! Where’d you find it?
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top