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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Background: I played tenor in high school (Yamaha YTS-52 w/Dukoff D6 MPC). It's been 20+ years since I've picked up a tenor.

I'm an alto player now. I'm strictly a jazz/rock player.

My alto is a Yamaha YAS-62 w/Meyer 5m MPC. This has the perfect amount of balance for me between free-blowing and resistance.

I want something similar for my (new to me) tenor that I just picked up (Viking M21 swing sonic).

I want to try out three mouthpieces to start with and want to get some recommendations. There's a dizzying amount of choices out there! Thanks!
 

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Meyer 6m/7m if you want to stay the same
Otto Link STM 7* if you want the "standard", though it's metal which you may or may not like
and maybe try the Dukoff D6 again

Those 3 will give you some common mouthpieces, aren't that expensive, can get from WWBW to try a vs. b. vs. c together, and then you can go from there.

What I will say is at least with the Meyer and STM that the quality control can be somewhat hit or miss and they like to at least get cleaned up to perform as well as they can. Both my alto 5m and link STM 7* got infinitely better once Mojobari cleaned them up for me. Didn't change anything about them, just got them to how they "should have been" from the factory.

Right now though on tenor I play 2 mouthpieces. Option 1 is a Link Slant Sig 5* that I use for "legit" playing. I try to avoid legit playing, but it's nice to have a small tip for quieter pit work. Option 2 and the one that I play almost exclusively is an Arnold Montgomery Luna 7*. It can play dark enough to blend with a section and has just a hair more baffle than a Link STM, but it will roar when pushed. I played it on several outdoor pops concerts with a wind ensemble this spring/summer and it blended well. Probably not my sax ensemble piece, but for this it worked. If you're playing more rock than jazz then you'll probably want something with a bit more baffle. From AM that would be the Katana, and there are a myriad of others out there that will bark a bit more.


That all said. You can't go wrong with this guy for jazz/rock and it's a VERY well made mouthpiece.
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?357170-eBay-Mojo-Tenor-Vortex-106%94-tip
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for that thorough reply!

I started off on the stock Yamaha rubber MPC when I got my tenor in high school, but quickly moved to the Dukoff metal D6 and I prefer the form factor. This may explain why I was able to feel right at home when I picked up an Alto with the rubber MPC several years ago.

Those AM mpcs look really good. Just watched his 30 minute demo video the other day. Really cool stuff.

Question - what do you mean by "cleaned up"?

Thanks again.
 

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I have gone through many alto mouthpieces in the last few years but I do the kink of work you are talking about and my RPC 115B has been my only tenor piece. You can get them used for 175 or so K
 

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Thank you so much for that thorough reply!

I started off on the stock Yamaha rubber MPC when I got my tenor in high school, but quickly moved to the Dukoff metal D6 and I prefer the form factor. This may explain why I was able to feel right at home when I picked up an Alto with the rubber MPC several years ago.

Those AM mpcs look really good. Just watched his 30 minute demo video the other day. Really cool stuff.

Question - what do you mean by "cleaned up"?

Thanks again.
flatten table and rails, thin the rails a bit, make sure the facing is the same on both sides. Many don't have flat tables or tips which doesn't allow the reed to seat properly and will make a piece sound stuffy or not respond properly. If the facing is longer on one rail than the other *which it usually is*, the reeds don't vibrate properly so response is diminished, etc. Very different than having it modified which is usually baffle or tip opening changes.

It's not terribly difficult to do, but it's comparable to having a new sax gone over by a technician to fix some of the faults in assembly. Unlevel toneholes, misc. pads leaking slightly, etc. A lot of the higher end and subsequently higher cost mouthpieces are done properly from the get-go and don't need any work. Similar to buying a horn from someone like Kessler or a myriad of other high end dealers where they go over every horn and fix that stuff before it ships, whether it's a brand new Selmer *usually quite bad*, or a cheaper Taiwanese horn. The hour or two of work makes all the difference and removes a lot of variables from horn to horn. Same with mouthpieces, you can try 5 different Link STM's and they are all liable to play differently. They may be the same make/model/tip opening, but the facings are all going to be slightly different
 

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All the advice above sounds very solid to me. If you want a versatile piece for jazz and rock, and if you're happy with your Meyer 5M on alto, I agree that an Otto Link 7* on tenor would be the standard middle-of-the-road equivalent, and it's honestly hard to go wrong with that tip opening (.105 inch). Spend some time on a good Link-style piece with that size and you can develop any sound you want, in my opinion.

I do agree that modern Links are hit-or-miss off the shelves. The tip and rails can be uneven, causing it to play stuffy and uncomfortably. If you can get a Link (either metal or rubber) from a good refacer who has evened things out, you should have a solid mouthpiece on your hands. There are also plenty of good Link-style pieces out there by a lot of those refacers: the Mouthpiece Cafe guys have the Bergonzi Slant, Matt Marantz has great rubber and metal Link-like pieces, 10M Fan has lots of different variations on that theme (large chambers with varying baffle designs for projection), Retro Revival has some as well. No shortage of good pieces out there these days.
 

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What's your budget?
 

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There are also plenty of good Link-style pieces out there by a lot of those refacers: the Mouthpiece Cafe guys have the Bergonzi Slant, Matt Marantz has great rubber and metal Link-like pieces, 10M Fan has lots of different variations on that theme (large chambers with varying baffle designs for projection), Retro Revival has some as well. No shortage of good pieces out there these days.
Add Phil-Tone and Sakshama to the list of metal Link-style tenor pieces.
 

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Congrats on the Viking Tenor purchase. Good choice. Are you looking for a subdued tone, neutral tone or bright tone? 10MFan makes a nice grouping of mouthpieces with different sound and playing characteristics within your budget.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Congrats on the Viking Tenor purchase. Good choice. Are you looking for a subdued tone, neutral tone or bright tone? 10MFan makes a nice grouping of mouthpieces with different sound and playing characteristics within your budget.
I would say neutral to bright. I'm playing in a band covering a lot of rock/pop such as Billy Joel and DMB.
 

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Theo Wanne's are pretty free blowing and may be a good alternative to the dukoff for a jazz/rock piece. New, they are pretty pricy as are jodyjazz.
AM is a solid choice for multi-genre purposes. The Aras, I played for a while, had the projection and brightness for louder settings and still retaining a nice rich core that suits a jazz tone.
There's a wide range of choices out there all of which are very high quality and relatively affordable:
Sakshama, Phil-tone, Saxscape, Mojobari, etc...
 

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10Mfan Showtime (1st generation) in a 7 or 7*, some Rigotti Jazz Gold reeds in a 3 light and you're set. Freeblowing and reed friendly, brighter side of the middle. Cut through the mix and still have a great tone.
 

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Phil-Tone Tribute Ltd for a more jazzy sound, but you can definitely also cut through if you want to.

Saxscape Live is brighter with more power but still works really well in a jazz setting.

I advise you to check out Neffmusic for reviews and sound clips.

EDIT: Also, the Phil-Tone Impulse is a great Berg like piece. Definitely consider.
 

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Jazz/Rock?
I recommend an older metal Larsen (Offset) 110-120/2/M...still can compete with all the other great mouthpieces out there.
 

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Another vote for the 10mfan mouthpieces. Not only are they great, Mark is a huge wealth of knowledge on sound, and from what I remember was a fan of the Viking horns when they were being made. Doesn't hurt to reach out to him and have a conversation.

- Saxaholic
 
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