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I got it on an online auction for $35.

Was that worth the price?

Also, I have never played a Selmer S80.

I currently have a Vandoren Optimum AL3.

What should I expect from the Selmer Mouthpiece?
 

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That's an excellent price IF it's not all messed up.
The C* will give you a bit of a rounder 'classical' sound. BUT it's also a good basic jazz piece with the right reeds and attitude from the player.
That is if you don't find that it plays a bit 'stuffy' compared to your Vandoren. :)
 

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If it is OK, yes, worth the price. You said vintage which should mean a scroll shank which would be worth about $75 in a long shank or $250+ in a short shank.
 

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If it is OK, yes, worth the price. You said vintage which should mean a scroll shank which would be worth about $75 in a long shank or $250+ in a short shank.
Are those "S 80s" Bruce?
 

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It will be good for Concert Band type stuff or sitting in an ensemble.
 

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To me, that is a misuse of the term "vintage". The S-80 Selmer mouthpieces are still being issued - nothing vintage about them. They are pretty good mouthpieces, though. I have several for soprano and a C* for alto.

The photo was not clear to me but could it be a C**? That would mean that it is a bit more open than a C*. DAVE
 

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Of the rubber C* Selmers of the past 60 years, you have the scroll short shank soloist, long shank soloist, long shank soloist "style", and the modern S-80 (since 1979). The one in question is older but that may be good as the facings were better assuming it hasn't been "worked on". My S-80 D from 1979 is far better than any that I have tried in recent years, a keeper.
 

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So scroll long/short shank C*s are vintage but S-80s are not, right? In other words, there aren't "vintage S-80s"?
 

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I'm only going by what the OP posted and the linked page shows. Both say it is an S-80 and from the photos it looked like an S-80. I'll bet this mouthpiece is an S-80, which to me means non-vintage. The real clue would be to see how the chamber opening is designed. The S-80 models have a horseshoe-style opening.

To call this "vintage" even if it may have been one of the first to hit the market is like trying to call a Selmer Super Action 80 II or III a vintage soprano just because it was one of the first ones made. The S-80 is a modern design.

As far as the early S-80's playing better than the most recent issues . . . well, if we are to believe what many claim about Selmer's quality-control on mouthpieces (which I don't but others do), one could stand an even chance of finding a good one from either period. DAVE
 

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I stand corrected about the chamber-opening shapes. I should have looked at mine before posting . . . my Soloist has what at first appears to be a round chamber-opening, but when you look at the top of the opening where the opening blends into the roof of the chamber, it is flat, making it horseshoe-shaped. My S-80 is square.

What difference does it make? I don't think it does but others have differing opinions about all of that mouthpiece lore. My take is that to determine if some feature matters one must have sampled literally thousands of the same design multiplied by as many differing designs as there can be to isolate one factor's result over another.

We've been over this quite a bit and I'm still not convinced. All I know is that for me, the piece's tip-opening may be the one most important factor. Yet, who really knows? You could play two or more similar pieces and either find they play the same (which I have) or find they are all different (which I have). It has to do with the totality of the circumstances, not just one factor.

I have bought mouthpieces without sampling the piece I bought, and I've done the pre-purchase testing - many times over. The one factor that I know before going in is the tip-opening. If it is too closed, it won't work for me. And yes, there are even exceptions to my own personal rule.

But baffles, chamber size, chamber-opening size and design, length of lay, etc., etc. continues to be unchartable for me - as numerous as my experiences have been, they are insufficient to separate out those factors and say for certainty that one does this, and another does that. DAVE
 

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The C* Soloist with the round/square chamber plays louder than the S-80 C*. I have both, but prefer the S-80.
 

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me too the s80 is the best classical -legit mpc i have played for sax . -still nothing since tops it for me.
 

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Outside of needing a good cleaning and polishing, the one pictured doesn't appear to be "chewed" to me. Looks like you probably got a really good deal on a decent mouthpiece. Hard to tell from the photos, but there could be a tiny indentation on one side at the very tip, but not where it would affect the way it plays. The rails look good (no chips).

Just out of curiosity...both of my Selmer mouthpieces are scroll shanks from the early 70's...C* and C** (horseshoe chamber)...but no other markings other than the Selmer Paris logo and "made in France" (with the C*/C** markings of course). Am I correct in assuming that these are "Soloist"? When did they start marking them with "Soloist" on the table?
 

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These are usually called "Soloist Style" and tend to be made alongside the Soloist. Not sure of the exact difference but doing a search may bring up some info or an expert may reply here.
 

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Saw the pics, this is a ordinary (there is not such thing as a VINTAGE S 80) but ill treated S 80.

So scroll long/short shank C*s are vintage but S-80s are not, right? In other words, there aren't "vintage S-80s"?
Yes, exactly. A S80 is a S80 new or old it didn't change much. Scroll , long shank scroll are, generally speaking, unmarked Soloist (Theo Wanne calls them Soloist-Style ) which were normally sold with the Selmer Mark VI in the '70 before the SA 80 appeared. Shortly after the standard Selmer mouthpiece became the S 80 which is been left unchanged to this day.

So a " Vintage" S 80 might be 30 years old ill treated mouthpiece which to al intends and purposes is (almost? ) identical to a new one. Plays with a nice but not too special tone although some folks really like them.

 

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When I was 17 (1957 . . . do the math . . .), I went to a large music store in Los Angeles and bought a new Selmer scroll-shank C* soprano mouthpiece. Still have it. I don't know when Selmer began issuing such pieces, but I bought a new one then. DAVE
 
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