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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks, we just added a soprano to our collection of saxes here at home. Im only a newbie and so's the rest of the family. Weve all been practising and learning on alto saxaphones, we each have our own units, so we each are responsible for looking after our own units as I keep re-interating to my 11 year old daughter. We all gave the soprano a go yesterday as it was a new item , and we found a couple of problems, so Im curious if its just us or maybe the saxaphone. All high notes sound magnificent, really really nice. also mid c b and a are fine but when you go to mid g and lower to d it sounds pretty screwed up. You can say blow say 3 mid g's and then the g will suddenly squeak like its a high g, ive checked the neck octave to make sure its transition changing between the two holes and it appears to be working fine but the g note just changes and obviously it will affect the lower notes as well. I guess the problem Im saying is tthat it appears to be inconsistent on the g and lower is this usually a tone problem or a mechanical problem
Thanks
Steve

Edit : Sorry I just forgot because we dont have access at the moment to soprano reeds "local music shop issues" we are using a No 2 clarinet reed, as the wifes got a couple of these for her clarinets. So could this be causing the problem
 

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The clarinet reed doesn't help but I don't think it is the problem. I helps to know the brand and if it is curved or straight. On the cheapos from China that are on ebay (mostly curved) the horns will not play below the bottom D no matter how much time is involved. A common problem when the G jumps the octave is that the G# is not closing all the way. Look to see that the lever is holding the pad down. When you play F# or below, the RH is closing it on its own. Also the little pad about the stack B can be a problem so make sure when you press B or C that the small pad is seating.
After we know the brand, it will make things a bit easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep chinese brand, its the exact same brand one that was given to clinton on his visit to china as a gift. Xai Hing. Its a straight soprano with two neck pieces. Its got a very nice note to it and the mechanicals are very neat and appears well constructed. But like most chinese brands Ive noticed things like the pads arent central to the tune ports ect, they seal, I cheacked using the light from a torch method. I know high g on most saxes is the one that will give most problems because it switches neck octaves. This one appears to be switching correctly but the tones are just very inconsistent. Its like I was saying you play mid g and it sounds like the neck octave has been switched open and closed on some of the notes without being fingered. It may be simply a pressure issue that when too much air pressure is applied its actually opening the neck octave. Ill have to have a better look at that now that I think about it
Steve
 

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simso said:
Yep chinese brand, its the exact same brand one that was given to clinton on his visit to china as a gift. Xai Hing. Its a straight soprano with two neck pieces. Its got a very nice note to it and the mechanicals are very neat and appears well constructed. But like most chinese brands Ive noticed things like the pads arent central to the tune ports ect, they seal, I cheacked using the light from a torch method. I know high g on most saxes is the one that will give most problems because it switches neck octaves. This one appears to be switching correctly but the tones are just very inconsistent. Its like I was saying you play mid g and it sounds like the neck octave has been switched open and closed on some of the notes without being fingered. It may be simply a pressure issue that when too much air pressure is applied its actually opening the neck octave. Ill have to have a better look at that now that I think about it
Steve
Uh, that's tone holes, not tune ports.

Anyway, it sounds like the sax needs to be checked over and set up by a repairman. Even expensive saxes need this done sometimes from new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ahh yeh tone holes not tune ports, bit like my vanderlin reeds yesterday. My terminology is lacking Im aware of that but Im getting there. Thanks for your reply
Steve
 
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