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Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
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I have a bunch of synthetic reeds I reviewed on my site. I probably played each one for a total of 15 minutes each for the review and not sure I will ever use them again as I am a cane reed guy. Is it acceptable to sell these like they are a mouthpiece. It's not like they are porous material like cane. I would think you could clean it like a mouthpiece and someone who uses synthetic reeds could get many months of use out of these. Or is this just gross to even consider. What do you think?
 

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I have a bunch of synthetic reeds I reviewed on my site. I probably played each one for a total of 15 minutes each for the review and not sure I will ever use them again as I am a cane reed guy. Is it acceptable to sell these like they are a mouthpiece. It's not like they are porous material like cane. I would think you could clean it like a mouthpiece and someone who uses synthetic reeds could get many months of use out of these. Or is this just gross to even consider. What do you think?
I don't know....................maybe if they came from Melissa Aldana.............:mrgreen:
 

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It doesn't happen often, but I've seen a few used synthetic reeds for sale here. If I were you, I'd thoroughly disinfect them myself, and then advertise them as "Used and sanitized synthetic reeds." Don't put the onus on prospective buyers (the customers will probably clean the reeds again anyway, but this way they'll have less concern that something may have already grown on them).

I'm a synth reed user on several different horns, but have never bought a used reed myself. One reason is scarcity of supply, as noted above. Given how few turn up for sale, finding the right model in the right strength is unlikely. I'm certainly not going to buy a stack of 20 used reeds just to get a couple that I really want. I'd have to buy them a la carte.

The second reason is pricing. Unlike with used mouthpieces, there's not a lot of room to reduce the price when you sell a used reed. With the prices of new Legere Signatures and some other models reaching or exceeding $30 per reed, I suppose some players might be enticed by a bargain price, although it would be a close call for me ("Buy a reed that's been in someone else's mouth, or pay $10 more?"). But if I can get a brand new Forestone Black Bamboo for well under $20, and I can, then it's hard to see how you could arrive at a price for a used BB that would both induce me to purchase it and make it worth your while to go to the trouble of arranging the sale.
 

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Of course it's acceptable to sell them, as what you say, reeds used for trial demo. I have a couple of each that I've used on occasion for years that came in with used horns: soprano, alto, and tenor. I soaked them in vinegar in a pill bottle overnight, then another overnight in mouthwash.

How you package and price them is up to you. I think 40% off an online discount price is fair.
 

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Wash them with Hydrogen Peroxide. Any buyer is going to do the same thing anyway because who would put a mouthpiece or reed that was said to be sterilized in their mouth on faith? If we can get a used synthetic reed market going, it could really take some of the sting out of paying $30 for a reed that you can't use. The only thing is they should be either unopened or 'tried once', not actually used for more than a few minutes. I can see hard feelings developing over the definition of 'tried once'. For this reason, although it would still be no guarantee, any such reed should be in its original packaging.
I say we just start doing this right now and see how it goes - in the marketplace, of course. I plan to list a few today - anybody game?
 

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i think the bigger issue with used reeds is not knowing how much they had been used. i think in your case, most people are more likely to take your word about usage.
 

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I use the silverware a restaurant sets for me--been in a whole lotta other mouths before mine.

And then washed.

Totally synthetic non-porous reeds such as Légère can be gently washed with dish soap and rinsed. That would be good enough for me, and what I do for new (to-me) mouthpieces as well.

If you are selling a Signature tenor 2.75 I'll buy it.
 

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Heck yeah, count me as interested! They're easy to disinfect so I would have no problem!
 

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I’ll trade you some slightly used underwear for a couple.

It doesn’t seem it would be any different from used mouthpieces.
Clean them with anything you can find before you play them.
I’m kind of curious why you would keep buying them if you don’t like them.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I’ll trade you some slightly used underwear for a couple.

It doesn’t seem it would be any different from used mouthpieces.
Clean them with anything you can find before you play them.
I’m kind of curious why you would keep buying them if you don’t like them.
I didn't buy them. They were sent to me to try them and to review them. I actually enjoyed trying them out but as I say in the reviews, I am a bit of a purist and nothing beats a great cane reed in my view. The synthetics are pretty good though. I haven't touched mine since the review and think they would be more appreciated by someone who plays them..........
 

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Disinfect and donate them.

I donated instruments and accessories to school kids in New Orleans through my friend Stafford Agee (in Rebirth Brass Band).
Have been doing this since Katrina.
 

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In the end it's the buyer's decision as to whether or not they want to buy used synthetic reeds. Just like buying a used mouthpiece, there are a lot of variables to consider: how was it treated before they got it and could it have been damaged? There's the health aspect. Was it cleaned and disinfected before being sent to them, and could the process used to disinfect it have harmed it? I'm not saying Steve would have done anything to have harmed the reed(s), just saying these are all things for a used reed buyer to consider. When all is said and done, it's their decision to buy the goods.
 

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I’m kind of curious why you would keep buying them if you don’t like them.
It looks like Steve was lucky enough not to have to pay for his, but I'll answer this for those of us who did:

I really want to like them! It would be great to have a consistent, long-lasting reed and not to have to deal with the vicissitudes of cane reeds.

However, because there's no place to try them before buying, I've wound up buying many of them just to check whether a different strength, cut, or material might have just what it takes to help me quit cane.
 
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