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Discussion Starter #1
I was watching a video of someone disassembling the Vito saxophone Hodges had late in his career (the heavily engraved one with the snakehead octave key). The mouthpiece the owner had on it, with Hodges' name scratched into it, has Bruno Royal Artist on it, with a "3" (presumably the tip opening/facing) etched on the side.

However a quick Google Search wasn't able to turn up anything about the piece. I turned up plenty about Bruno Royal Artist-stenciled horns, a clarinet mouthpiece, and what looks like a crystal sax piece with a model of 30S, but nothing about what Hodges has here.

View attachment 216550

Anyone know about this piece?
 

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I was watching a video of someone disassembling the Vito saxophone Hodges had late in his career (the heavily engraved one with the snakehead octave key). The mouthpiece the owner had on it, with Hodges' name scratched into it, has Bruno Royal Artist on it, with a "3" (presumably the tip opening/facing) etched on the side.

However a quick Google Search wasn't able to turn up anything about the piece. I turned up plenty about Bruno Royal Artist-stenciled horns, a clarinet mouthpiece, and what looks like a crystal sax piece with a model of 30S, but nothing about what Hodges has here.

View attachment 216550

Anyone know about this piece?
I have one of these. I think mine is a #2, and boy is it ever close. I seriously doubt Hodges played a #3; I bet it was opened up.

Nice tone, quiet, not a lot of projection; would probably be better if I had it opened up.

I think that this basic molding design part was used by a lot of store brand and OEM mouthpieces. It MIGHT (speculating) be the same internally as Brilhart MPs of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I seriously doubt Hodges played a #3; I bet it was opened up...It MIGHT (speculating) be the same internally as Brilhart MPs of the time.
Interesting. I know Hodges played Brilharts at various points in his career, and I do have a Great Neck myself, but there's no pictures showing the internals of this piece to compare it with. I'm also not sure what tip opening he played on the Brillys. The only information on tip openings I've ever found is he had a Berg .083 at one point (no information on the facing length or chamber size, though).
 

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Judging from Photo-Material from the last years:
Hodges toured not with he "fancy" version with the snake head and pearl inlays which was discussed on the forum before and was for sale for a lot of money - but witht he VITO Hodges model S135 and played it with his Berg larsen mpc with a tip of .080.
I attach some live photos. That´s the same set-up as in the live concert in Berlin Philharmonic with Black Butterfly etc. and the Kopenhagen tour.

1969 Live at Tivoli Garden
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_JWi7P99YE

Live in Berlin 1967 (Black Butterfly)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pl9d9SP9bw

the VITO S135 has no adjustment screws, might screw you less up when touring... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, I'm aware of the Berg's opening. I'm curious if he played that opening on the Brilharts he used earlier in his career, as well.
 

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I have a couple of Bruno Royal Artist alto pieces in my hoard, all relatively closed tip openings too. I was never able to find diddly squat online about them either.
 

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It looks just like the old beuscher white pieces...for those who have one is it the same piece?

I have one i opened to a .076. They are nice compact sounding little pieces.
 

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I have a couple of Bruno Royal Artist alto pieces in my hoard, all relatively closed tip openings too. I was never able to find diddly squat online about them either.
Charles Bruno immigrated from Germany to Macon, Georgia in 1832. In 1834, Bruno moved to New York, first being listed as a book seller in 1837. In 1838 Bruno formed a partnership with Christian F. Martin. That partnership was dissolved in 1839. Bruno next established the partnership Bruno & Cargill from 1851 to 1853. When that partnership was dissolved, Bruno formed Bruno & Son, a partnership with his son Charles Bruno Junior. Charles Bruno Senior died in 1884 leaving his son to run the business. Bruno & Son had offices at 460 West 34th Street, N.Y. and a southwest division at 3043 East Commerce Street San Antonia, TX. Bruno sold all types of instruments and was the exclusive U.S. distributor for Besson brasses, Boosey & Hawkes woodwinds and sheet music, Kay guitars, etc., and had a rental and repair department. The company was acquired by the Kaman Corporation (1970's?), thus bringing to an end the oldest (+130 years) musical instrument wholesaler in the U.S.

"Royal Artist" was a Bruno & Son trade name used on band instruments, including saxophones, pianos, accordions, and woodwind instruments. It obviously was also used on accessories. The white plastic Royal Artist mouthpiece is a common Babbitt piece stenciled for many other distributors in addition to Bruno and Son. Some of them are listed in this blog. The blog also reveals the secret recipe used in its production.

If you need a dose of saxophone lore with an old mouthpiece, here is the alternative story. It was made of genuine ivory by European "royal artists."

Mark
 
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