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I recall doing that in the '70s, with my teeth against the reed - move fingers vigorously as you see in the video.

Don't forget the hat. It is very important and should not be neglected.
 

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Great motivic development in that solo! Gunther Schuller would have a field day analyzing it.
 

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Oddly enough the finger wiggling doesn't really do much when you put teeth on the reed.
Notice that his pitch isn't changing as much as his fingers are moving. It's all pretty much an imitation of a dog whistle - but with a HAT. You gotta have the Hat.
 

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John Gilmore is fiery on his recording with Clifford Jordan, "Blowing in From Chicago" but this is... well... hmmm
Agreed, great session! Next to John and Clifford there's Horace Silver, Curly Russell and Art Blakey....no doubt John Gilmore could play. Even joined Earl 'Fatha' Hines band for a while. He could play various styles.
Here's a fragment of a story by John Pareles in the NYT that shows John Gilmore's influence on John Coltrane:

"The Arkestra relocated to New York City in the early 1960's. In 1961, Mr. Gilmore sat in at Birdland with a group led by Willie Bobo. He was nervous about the group's aggressive rhythm section, and he said in one interview, "Unable to play with the group, I decided to play against them." Afterward, he said, one onlooker, John Coltrane, ran up to him shouting: "You got it! You got the concept!" and asked him for lessons. The concept, Mr. Gilmore added, was "playing rhythmically and melodically at the same time."
 

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Practice your overtones and you will get to know that playground.
Yes, this is just altissimo flexibility. The hard thing to do is play lines that make sense up there. The stuff he does in that video is very easy once you have a grasp of overtones and altissimo.
 

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Coltrane asking Gilmore for lessons in '61???? Really ??? I doubt it.
 

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Coltrane asking Gilmore for lessons in '61???? Really ??? I doubt it.
Why would you doubt that? Remember 1961 also was the year when he hired Eric Dolphy and recorded at the Village Vanguard. Trane got a lot of negative attention regarding his playing those days, e.g. Down Beat critic John Tynan described the group as "musical nonsense being peddled in the name of jazz" and "a horrifying demonstration of what appears to be a growing anti-jazz trend."
Also, John was constantly looking for new things to learn, so why not some things his might have liked in John Gilmore's playing? Anyway, you certainly are entitled to have your own opinions and doubts! I'm just curious why you would doubt this particular story.

Here is the source of the fragment:
http://www.nytimes.com/1995/08/22/obituaries/john-gilmore-63-saxophonist-in-the-avant-garde-of-jazz.html
 

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Why would you doubt that? Remember 1961 also was the year when he hired Eric Dolphy and recorded at the Village Vanguard. Trane got a lot of negative attention regarding his playing those days, e.g. Down Beat critic John Tynan described the group as "musical nonsense being peddled in the name of jazz" and "a horrifying demonstration of what appears to be a growing anti-jazz trend."
Also, John was constantly looking for new things to learn, so why not some things his might have liked in John Gilmore's playing? Anyway, you certainly are entitled to have your own opinions and doubts! I'm just curious why you would doubt this particular story.

Here is the source of the fragment:
http://www.nytimes.com/1995/08/22/obituaries/john-gilmore-63-saxophonist-in-the-avant-garde-of-jazz.html
Coltrane studied with John Gilmore, John showed John how to 'get out there'. True story.

Anyway Marshall Allen took it a step further in my opinion. Pretty good for a 90 year old huh?

 
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