Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's your opinion?

Recommend by my friend, I recently listen his 2 CDs - "Out Of The Forrest" and "Sit Down And Relax With Jimmy Forrest".

He just sounds great ~~~~~~
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,076 Posts
I LOVE Jimmy Forrest. Unfortunately, the success of "Night Train" overshadowed his career. He is forever known by many for that and only that. But "Night Train" is something of an aberration for him. He had a beautiful tone, and major chops. Everything he did is worth listening to.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009-
Joined
·
2,761 Posts
He's certainly one of my favorites; I especially enjoy the album Soul Battle with Oliver Nelson and King Curtis, as well as his tenor/organ sides with Jack McDuff and Larry Young. Another nice tune beautifully done is "Bolo Blues" which, I believe, was the flip side of "Night Train".
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,076 Posts
Yes. All the sides with McDuff are classic, as far as I'm concerned: the sax/B3 combo has never been better than that. I love Forrest when he's doing bop, standards, anything he does: but my R&B side wants to hear McDuff and JF do "The Honeydripper" about 6 times a day.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician.
Joined
·
1,530 Posts
I love his sound, I listen to out of the forrest and forrest fire a bit as well as soul battle. I would like of his recordings.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Columnist/Official SOTW Guru
Joined
·
3,764 Posts
I've been a major Jimmy Forrest fan since the first time I heard :Bolo Blues."
I'm lucky enough to be working one of my Alto students through the tune and Jimmy's solo, this afternoon. :)

Reedsplinter is right. Everyone seems to remember Night Train, but there are so many other great albums with Jimmy playing some great stuff.

Sit Down and Relax with Jimmy Forrest.....great album, easy intro to Jimmy.

Our Delight. with Miles Davis.......good stuff if you can put up with the crap sound quality.

Jimmy Forrest & the Oliver Nelson big band..........interesting album. Cast of star players but always leaves me unsatisfied for some reason. "Soul Street" is a good track and "I wanna Blow Blow Blow" but I just can't really get into this album.

BTW Cutis at saxsolos.com has transcriptions of Bolo Blues for anyone intersted. Great tune to get your slow blues playing happening on.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,076 Posts
JLeurck said:
+100! Jimmy Forrest was a bad man!
Absolutely, totally, wonderfully bad.


By the way: that quote, "Writing about music is like dancing about architecture," may or may not have been said, or written, by Zappa; probably wasn't. Nobody knows who said it. It's been attributed also to Laurie Anderson, to Elvis Costello, and to Steve Martin. It's such a great quip that you'd think somebody would claim it!

Zappa certainly did say, or write: "Most rock journalism is people who can't write, interviewing people who can't talk, for people who can't read".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Reedsplinter said:
Absolutely, totally, wonderfully bad.


By the way: that quote, "Writing about music is like dancing about architecture," may or may not have been said, or written, by Zappa; probably wasn't. Nobody knows who said it. It's been attributed also to Laurie Anderson, to Elvis Costello, and to Steve Martin. It's such a great quip that you'd think somebody would claim it!

Zappa certainly did say, or write: "Most rock journalism is people who can't write, interviewing people who can't talk, for people who can't read".
Frank Zappa! ...also a very bad man!
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,076 Posts
JLeurck said:
Frank Zappa! ...also a very bad man!
Very definitely! Though not in any way that makes him at all resemble Jimmy Forrest. At least not superficially. Funny how that works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That's All

I listened to Forrest's "That's All" in his "Out of the Forrest" album and compared it to the same song played by Ben Webster. Such a big difference.

To me, Forrest sounded more elegant and smoother, whilst Webster's was beefly, and definately much darker.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
I worked in a little big band that Jimmy co-led with Al Grey after they both left the Basie band. This was in the late '70's, if I remember correctly. Does anyone remember Jimmy's ballad feature with the Basie band? It was 'Body and Soul'. Jimmy played a very long cadenza at the end where he ended up beating on his chest and screaming.

His sound was way past big. It was enormous. I've never heard a sound as fat, deep and round. When he sat in the section, he would pat his foot in 4/4, on every beat. His body twisted slightly to the right when he sat down and played, and he sat to my right, so he couldn't see me at all. I was playing lead alto. But he matched my phrasing perfectly. He was listening. Jimmy was a very nice guy, but he didn't take any ****. I saw him get very angry once when he overheard some of the young members of the band talking about using drugs. He delivered a very stern, no nonsensense lecture about his first hand experence, and he had better not see any of us messing with that stuff.

Jimmy was a beautiful cat, and I miss him.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,076 Posts
sideC said:
I worked in a little big band that Jimmy co-led with Al Grey after they both left the Basie band. This was in the late '70's, if I remember correctly. Does anyone remember Jimmy's ballad feature with the Basie band? It was 'Body and Soul'. Jimmy played a very long cadenza at the end where he ended up beating on his chest and screaming.

His sound was way past big. It was enormous. I've never heard a sound as fat, deep and round. When he sat in the section, he would pat his foot in 4/4, on every beat. His body twisted slightly to the right when he sat down and played, and he sat to my right, so he couldn't see me at all. I was playing lead alto. But he matched my phrasing perfectly. He was listening. Jimmy was a very nice guy, but he didn't take any ****. I saw him get very angry once when he overheard some of the young members of the band talking about using drugs. He delivered a very stern, no nonsensense lecture about his first hand experence, and he had better not see any of us messing with that stuff. Jimmy was a beautiful cat, and I miss him.
What a great story. It's enormously cool to hear from someone who KNEW the man and played with him. I've loved his music for ages: always one of my favorite players, from when I first heard "Night Train" back in the stone age. Thanks, man.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009-
Joined
·
2,761 Posts
Yes, nice story, thanks so much!
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top