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Hi,

a few years ago I bought a Jean Dumont clarinet (mid 60's, probably); it had spent at least a decade in its box, but crack-free and all keys were working. I paid a pretty low price, but the horn needed a lot of maintenance.

My clarinet teacher looked at it, and said it resembled her Buffet, even the keywork.

Has anybody had a horn from this maker?
Is it a copy of a Buffet?
I'm asking because I'm considering repadding this horn with kangaroo leather pads, and it would be better to know which dimensions would fit better before ordering a pad set.
 

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I can't speak to whether or not it will affect what pads you need to order, but I just pulled out my modern (2005) R13 and the keywork is definitely different in a number of ways.

My throat Ab key, for example, comes straight across the horn (appears perpendicular to the bore of the instrument) from the post when looking straight at it as in your third photo. Yours appears to be angled a few degrees up from perpendicular. The hole might be in the same place, though.

On the lower joint, the rod that holds the three rings and one pad is shorter on your clarinet than on my R13. On my clarinet, the rod ends just above the top hole and the arm that holds the key cup for the highest hole on the lower joint is perpendicular to the rod. On your clarinet, this rod ends earlier and the arm is angled up from there. Again, though, the hole might be in the same place.

I also think the B/F# and Eb/Bb sliver keys are angled differently on your instrument, as is the C#/G# LH pinky key.

In general, my horn has fewer angled surfaces on it than your horn. The rings around the tone holes, for example, seem to have flatter upper surfaces on mine, with more rounded edges, where on yours they seem more beveled, like they were machined more simply.

My instrument is modern, but an admittedly rather quick glance at the two R13s for sale on Saxquest, one from the 70's and one from the 60's, seems to indicate that the keywork on my horn is pretty similar to those.

With all that said, it's possible that all the holes are in the same place and that it's just the keywork that's different. I don't know enough about the mechanical aspects of the clarinet to have a way to say for sure one way or another, but that might be something that you can check against your teacher's Buffet.




I'm not positive I'm using all the right terminology, so forgive me if I use the wrong terms or if I am using terms incorrectly!


side note: is Saxquest really trying to sell a 40+ year old clarinet that has cracked in the past (and been repaired, to be fair) for $2100+? I know new R13s have gotten expensive in the last few years, but jeez. It's not like they're rare!
 

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I have a Buffet from the mid 1960s. I will compare the keywork against your photos later today. My first observation is that I think the rings look different.
 

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I have a Buffet from the mid 1960s. I will compare the keywork against your photos later today. My first observation is that I think the rings look different.
No, the keywork is different ... both on the upper and lower joints.

Edit: actually it looks more like a Malerne stencil to me.
 

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The only Buffet stencils I know of are Carl Fischer (like, 80-100 years ago; Carl Fischer was Buffet's importer) and Olds, rebranded as the "Opera" model. Olds also rebranded Buffet Dynaction saxes. Great players.
 

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Buffet was actually buying a lot of horns from other makers (Schreiber for example) rather than stenciling for others (at least in recent times consistent with the horn in question the Carl Fisher might very well have been but in another era).
 

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We can therefore conclude that it's positively *not* a Buffet stencil.
You've all provided very valuable tips; thanks all for the heads-ups!
 

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It definitely doesn't look like a Buffet. No Buffet clarinet that I've seen, whether made by them or for them (e.g. by Schreiber), had those "conical" rings. A few months ago I had a clarinet with exactly that shape of rings and was also curious what it is. I think it had a different name than yours and if I remember, no one knew for sure what it was either. I'll try to find the info I got about it and post it if I do.
 

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It definitely doesn't look like a Buffet. No Buffet clarinet that I've seen, whether made by them or for them (e.g. by Schreiber), had those "conical" rings. A few months ago I had a clarinet with exactly that shape of rings and was also curious what it is. I think it had a different name than yours and if I remember, no one knew for sure what it was either. I'll try to find the info I got about it and post it if I do.
Now that you mention the wrinkle about "conical rings", the pictures above do look quite a bit like an old French-made Martin Freres "LaMonte" that I have. It has the slightly beveled rings around the tone holes.

There's also this page:
http://www.clarinetpages.net/vintage-odd-brands/dumont-jean-dumont
 

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OK I found it, but don't have any photos of the lower section, so only comparing the other parts. The rings look identical with that taper/conical shape. The top most trill key looks the same in that slight change of angle a little before the arm meets the key cup. The socket rings are similar in how the middle curve is wider than on a Buffet (I have a side by side comparison). Overall it's really similar.

There are some slight differences that are hard to be sure from these photos and the photos I have.
The trill key touchpieces and the upper section banana key seem to have a sharper end compared with your clarinet.

This was a Siour Robert clarinet. At first I thought it was a Robert, which is sort of a known name, but it's not. It's a (Robert) Siour, which apparently is the same which later merged with Siour Chapelain. Supposedly at least one of them was an actual maker... but I could barely find any info. so most likely this clarinet was made by Siour, Chapelain, or the later merge of the two. I guess any of them might have also had stencils made so who knows.
 
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