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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,
I've been using a rubber classical mouthpiece for some time now, and I would like to look into getting a metal jazz one.
I understand that the use of metal in making the piece changes the way it resonates (making it louder? Anything else?)--but what is the benefit to having a 'jazz' mouthpiece?
How are metal jazz pieces visibly different from metal classical pieces?
From what I've seen, jazz mouthpieces are a little more slender and tubular, and usually have what would appear to be a black spot on the top.
This description, however, may fit ANY metal mouthpiece. I don't really know...
Thanks for your feedback!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
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PrezFan: There are differing opinions about what you stated as fact. I'm of the opinion that a mouthpiece's material matters NOT as to the way it plays OR for what kind of music it is best suited.

The black spots are bite-plates affixed by certain manufacturers - certainly not an indicator of what kind of music to play with it.

And, while some contend that one needs a certain mouthpiece to play certain kinds of music, I disagree, but will defer to those who think otherwise. If someone thinks they need a classical mouthpiece to play classical music, who am I to question it?

On the other hand, I don't know any real players who think one needs a "jazz" mouthpiece to play jazz. DAVE
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
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I have tried various metals on alto over the pas 45 years and I just cannot find them to have and advantage. On Tenor they are great but for alto they just don't have enough density in the sound. I use a rubber Super Session that has good power without the icy sound of metal. Try the SS, Meyer, Jody or Runyon before you metalize.
 
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