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Can you recommend a good book for learning Jazz theory that is rather short but still contains the most important things that you really need? (Especially for improvising)

I know the one by Mark Levine is pretty good but it’s too big which is kind of demotivating for me...
 

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Jazz theory is very broad

Any topic in particular you looking to go over?

If you do not know where you'd like to start, I suggest transcribing and following your ear for improvisational language and supplementing that with a study of basic chord theory.

Books are good for chord theory and analysis but language must come directly from those who speak it. No way around that unless you are not looking to participate in the black american tradition, which is fine

Make a short term of goal of learning how to analyze any tune. With this short term goal in mind, you can now scour youtube and various blog sights on how to accomplish this. Other members may be able to suggest specific videos + blog post + etc.

Once you can see and hear form clearly, the application of the language you have been practicing will come easier and you will be able to make more personal decisions on what to apply, where to apply it and when to apply it. These last three factors must all be guided by the ear.

And lastly, find a teacher if possible
 

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Peter Spitzer’s Jazz Theory Book is exactly all that you’re looking for.
Check out its reviews on Amazon for more details.
 

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Dan Hearle's book The Jazz Language: A Theory Text for Jazz Composition and Improvisation is good – and very short (60 pages).

https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Languag...y+Text+for+Jazz+Composition+and+Improvisation
This a thousand times. Dan Haerle's book is my very favorite music theory text in the world. It's geared specifically toward people who want practical and applicable music theory that will help them to... well... make music. Professionally or as a hobby.

After I was done with music school (I had the privilege of studying with Dan himself, he's absolutely wonderful), I gave my copy to my dad so he could check it out. Then I bought another copy because I missed it and I ended up using it with my students all the time.

I'll recommend "The Jazz Language" before any other music theory text out there, that I've seen.
 

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once you spend some quality time with them, please report back here. this is a common question many struggle with.
 
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