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Discussion Starter #1
Just a brief description of my situation right now.

I'm planning on auditioning for the jazz programs at 4 -5 colleges this winter, including Cal State Northridge, Cal Arts, UNLV, and Shenendoah University. I'm happy (as much as I can be) with my current setup based on my financial situation. I find my tone is coming together and my transcription work is paying off too as I'm hearing more of my 'work' in my playing. However my tune list by memory is short and I really need to begin working a lot on the audition material. Some of the schools require as many as 4 tunes to be played so right now I'm thinking of playing Invitation, You Don't Know What Love Is, There Will Never Be Another You, and Au Privave.

I will take these to my private teacher but I'm looking for as much feedback as possible!!!
If you have any advice on auditions, any advice on these tunes, transcriptions or recordings I should check out or have anything else to say please reply!
 

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If you want feedback, why not post samples of your playing? You could always participate in the SOTW tuneof the month topic.
 

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Well if it were me I'd work up a bossa and I'd swap out one of the standards for a blues of some sort if those would fit with the requirements. I know all these schools have their own set of tryout requirements so that may or may not be possible.
 

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Well if it were me I'd work up a bossa and I'd swap out one of the standards for a blues of some sort if those would fit with the requirements. I know all these schools have their own set of tryout requirements so that may or may not be possible.
He said he's doing Au Privave, so he's already doing a blues.

If requirements are just to blow over standards, your 4 look fine to me! Just make sure you really know each tune well, because there is a good chance they'll have you play them in a different way (I had Mulgrew Miller make me play There Will Never Be Another You as a verrry slow balld during a jury)


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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the help. That's a really good point Dave! I've been practicing Au Privave at various tempos and You Don't Know What Love Is medium and as a ballad. That's a really cool story about you and Mulgrew Miller. I'm assuming you heard Kenny Garrett is doing jazz at William Patterson? I've seen your posts on JOTW, I look forward to seeing the next one!
 

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i suggest memorizing "take the coltrane", working on "inner Urge", memorizing donna lee, picking 3-4 keys that feel REALLy uncomfortable to you and memorizing a few melodies in that key. don't work exclusively on your audition tunes. it will sound stale. never forget that jazz is a fluid and emotional art, and should be approached from a fresh state of mind. yeah, you have to practice, but the language and your facility is where your expression will be derived from, so practicing things that challenge both of those components will help you no matter what (donna lee, inner urge for facility). i suggested take the coltrane because it's a different view on jazz blues that isn't so attached to jazz changes. it lets you see bigger phrases and themes. i think your picks are good, but if you are serious about this thing, you need to go beyond them. hours beyond them. about the keys that are difficult: as you are listening, make notes about licks, solos, heads that you like. come back to those little sections and write them down. you don't need to memorize and write out entire solos. that is waste of time unless your intention is to work on comprehensive style or ear training. taking little bits here and there and adding them to your practice journal, memorizing the ones you like the most in multiple keys and applying them to the tunes you are working on will get you deeper, faster.

your picks are good. once you have met the day's practice requirements, that's when your practice can begin. i mean, go a little deeper. don't just work on what you are preparing to perform. you need something to keep you on your toes and slightly uncomfortable. that's where the growth takes place.
 
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