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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never seen this notation before. It is written on someone's notation software, and there are lines connecting two consecutive notes. Sometimes the lines meet in the middle above and between the notes forming a teepee. Sometimes they dip down, forming an inverted cone. They are straight lines.

I am wondering if they are falls followed by doits and visa-versa, or something else... Can someone help me understand them?

Thanks!
 

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Can you post a picture?
 

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Is it the only ONE line between the notes, or more (you wrote "lines")?
Usually, if it is straight, it should be SLIDE, and depending on the location closer or farther to the first-second note - slide up or below.
Sometimes, if notes are very close to each other, GLISSANDO could be saved as a straight line (without name).
Falls, to my knowledge, are always curved (but maybe I'm wrong ...?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
0612180949.jpg

0612180948a.jpg

They are unfortunately upside down in spite of my best efforts, but this is the articulation mark. What is it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
marking question.jpg

OK, here's one right side up
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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This is a cut and paste from the "The United States Army Field Band Jazz Notation" publication. A lot of Sammy Nestico charts I have played use this figure quite a bit. In Finale that "V" symbol is called a "bend" perhaps having more to do with guitar stylings.

Jazz Turn.JPG
 

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It's true a V might mean a bend down and up, but I think would only usually be written on or between the same notes. And on a saxophone you would never write an upward bend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks!
 

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saxoclese has it right - it's a turn. The dot at the end is an indication that the note is staccato, not related to the turn.
 
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