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Jazz isn’t exactly dead .

Last Friday I was in “ Somma Vesuviana” a minute town above Naples on the slopes of the “ Mount Somma” (The smaller mountain next to Mount Vesuvius).

They have now for 5 years at “ Summarte” a Theater in this small town, the formula “ Jazz and Baccalà” ( Jazz and salted cod), you go there and you may chose to dine and then listen to a concert (Salted cod is the speciality of the lace) or simply sit and listen.

The place was half full, all the people there were above 50 , the youngest person around was the organizer Marco Panico (23) and his girlfriend ( can’t remember her name).

Will it survive in 20 years time? I can’t say but it will be very tough. In the meantime it’s there. I loved it and much recommend it to anyone going to Naples- Italy
 

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any type of music only lives if there is an audience. When the audience is no longer there then it isn’t .

Can’t help it. Music is not something of compulsive appreciation. If the next generations will not like it. So be it.

We can’t change that, we will be gone by then.
 

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Jazz did have huge following when it bordered easier music ( Time Out, Kind of Blue and My favorite things and Watermelon Man are among the best seller records ever, even in the normal hit parade).

But the more jazz restricts itself to intellectual circles the less it is likely to survive outside.

There will always be a following but it will never be huge. At the concert I mentioned above a friend was commenting on it and I said: “ Could you whistle the theme of the last piece” , of course he couldn’t.

I bet anyone could at the very least whistle even something like the first lines of “ So what” even after having listed once.
 

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Cheers JL.

I find that one very important element for the public is a piece with a very clear, mostly repeating, theme and clear melody to go.

Even a ballad with a very long theme would be difficult to remember to most people and won’t please most . Lush life for example. But there are exception like Harlem Nocturne which has been played so much in film noir like scenarios that even kids are born with the imprinting of its long theme.

The approach of Sonny Rollis for example is often been a simple mostly short repeating theme and then a virtuoso solution of that.
 

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most certainly , Jazz was very alive when it was dance music and the smaller combo's did popular song's treatment.

Coltrane & Parker (among others) had other ambitions. They wanted the Academia validation and sought a different path than the one followed from people before of them, whom were essentially providing quality entertainment to masses that had very little else.

Jazz for the most part was performed in from of people dancing and dining not sitting religiously in a theatre.

I've said it before in other long threads disputing how lively Jazz is.

The moment it sought the the way to enter universities and consevatoria it lost the popular base . It is not an intellectual for of art like many others. (at its top) Jazz is Played and appreciated by intellectuals. Keith Jarret becomes very angry if one coughs ( he inists to give candies around to prevent this) and would certainly refuse to play for people dancing, singing, dining and so forth.

 

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I am not so confident on the future of jazz.

Despite a certain revival, this music is generation logged. My son (32) and his friends does listen to some of it (he has " inherited" my entire vinyl collection ) but I remember when he told me that listening to Lennie Tristano's piece " line up " was a torture to him (one of my all time favorites) and his girlfriend.

 

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the entire matter is contained in this video on Giant Steps.


This embodies the why's and how's this approach to music results in being alien to those whom aren't privy to the mysteries of the " code". the great majority will not even attempt to get to know the code and simply move on.

I remember that my first experiences as a kid with Jazz were " Stan Kenton's, Intermission Riff" and the t Nunzio Rotondo titles to an Italian edition of " Nero Wolfe".



Pretty far out for a kid of 12!

I can't say why I was attracted by " Giant Steps" immediately from the first time that I've listened to it, but once you hear and see the explanation you see how this should be, for the most part of us, so extremely alien.
 

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Cheers Click! :)

Jazz isn't dead but as said before it changed its social role.

From dance music and entertainment form ( big bands era), jazz was very popular on the mainstream radio and television, it then got more and more into a more intellectual base.

It entered universities and conservatories, thesis were written on it and album's sales dropped. Take 5, My favorite things were hits in the normal chart. They sold millions of records. When was the last time when a " Jazz" hit made it into the " pop" charts?

Today the wide public has a very limited access to jazz. In the NL the theaters which had mostly a Jazz programming are now adding other types or music because they wouldn't be able to sustain the expenses without making tickets unaffordable..

The Bimhuis, Amsterdam's jazz temple, is a relatively small venue and receives subsidies which allow to keep the tickets affordable especially for the minor events . They fill regularly the place (standing tickets too!). Most young people are Jazz students at the conservatory close by.

I have been sometimes with my son, who is not a music student, he does listen to Jazz, but he calls himself a Musical Nerd among his friends (some of whom also listen to Jazz), but even hem at 32, is hardly representative of the young trends and generation.

Take some time (really) to watch the videos especially when people say why they DON'T like it


OMG...:(:whistle: ( quote from the next video.... : " No girl will ever take the top off for a saxophone player....." :(

 

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Well, they were not " my stats", but the ones of " all about jazz"

There are more such things

https://bluesjazzlondon.wordpress.c...hics-of-blues-and-jazz-listeners-in-6-graphs/

https://www.npr.org/sections/ablogs...-about-younger-jazz-audiences?t=1555783827636

https://www.radiodiscussions.com/showthread.php?619464-Jazz-Listener-Demographics

There are many threads where the health state of jazz is discussed.

There is no conclusion but numbers dwindle more and more, the new revival may be around the corner, but I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for it.
 

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Or at the very least a nice joke.

An TV evangelist, a Woman from Miami and a Saxophone player walk into a bar.
 

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if you give me some more elements which I may use to search I am happy to run a search in the archives
 

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I actually learned to listen to Jazz after I had been exposed to Rock (mostly Progressive Rock but also other types) and Disco Music ( I was a DJ at a radio station in Italy when I was 18). As a child my encounters with jazz were mostly limited to some New Orleans style and some Jazz used on Italian TV as soundtrack or the occasional TV program. When I was a radio DJ there were colleagues doing a Jazz program and I was listening. I had been introduced to Roland Kirk from the playing of Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson and that got me curious.

I owe a lot to the TV of those years!

Television, back then, was not so much entertainment as it was education (those foolish times! :unsure: :oops::cool:) I am not sure that Jazz is alive and well, but like so many things that I like they are a part of my history. My 34 years old son, has all my records and will have all my CD's.

I have mentioned this before, once he told me that he listened to Lenny Tristano's " line up" and couldn't stand it... . It is not that he wasn't exposed to good music , he just doesn't like everything I liked (he likes other things which we both like).

Intermission Riff ( the piece is by Stan Kenton but this in this is an elaborate version with Sitars!) was certainly one of my favorite, was on a 1968 program TV7


then there was Nunzio Rotondo on flugelhorn on these title music from the Nero Wolfe series


this was a program on Gentlemen's players


this was a 1980 progran on Chet Baker (He spoke Italian, lived in Rome and was in Jail in Rome too)

 
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