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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just found this great clip of this scene in a jazz club from a 1961 film called Night Tide, starring Dennis Hopper. I thought it might be interesting for people to post or describe scenes showing jazz as part of the plot of movies they know of, especially if they are lesser known than ones like Bird and Round Midnight.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here's another one from Sweet Love Bitter, starring Dick Gregory as a Bird-type character.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow! That's great, thanks for posting it. And Chico even has a one-line part.
 

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I was looking for Coltrane and Johnny Hartman in "The Bridges of Madison County", but could only find this clip (without Coltrane) on YouTube:


You don't see the musicians, but without the music this would be another scene.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good point, and great scene. Clint is a longtime jazz lover.

How about this one?

 

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Bert Haanstra (31 May 1916 - 23 October 1997) was a Dutch film and documentary maker who often used jazz music in his (humorous) productions.

The first example is a documentary about the glass industry in The Netherlands. It was filmed back in 1958 and won the Academy Award for Documentary Short Subject in 1959. The clip is about 10 minutes long. Don't stop to early, the part after 8:30 is very funny :).


The second example was filmed in 1961 and shows the amazing similarity between the visitors and the animals of Artis, a famous old Zoo in Amsterdam (founded in 1838). About 11 minutes long and also quite funny.


And here some links for those who want to read and know more about Bert Haanstra:
- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bert_Haanstra
- http://www.berthaanstra.nl/english.html

Enjoy!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I enjoyed those. In fact I think I saw the glass blowing one back in the 60's. The skill those guys have in manipulating the rod is pretty amazing. In addition, we went to that zoo one day when we visited Amsterdam five years ago. We stayed just a couple of blocks away and it was very nice. A lot more modern now than in the film.

They were showing The Conversation on tv the other night. I hadn't seen it in over 20 years I'm sure, but I always loved it and saw it a number of times back when it was new. If you haven't ever seen it is a real masterpiece and probably Francis Ford Coppola's best film. It stars Gene Hackman as a surveillence specialist with a great supporting role from the late John Cazale and a bit part by a young Harrison Ford. Hackman is a solitary suspicious guy who keeps to himself and whose only entertainment seems to be playing the sax for his own pleasure at home. There are a couple of scenes of him in his apartment alone playing along to a jazz album on his tenor. Unfortunately, he couldn't actually play and it is pretty obvious in the close ups. Nevertheless, it adds alot to the film, especially for us sax lovers.

 

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Here's another one from Sweet Love Bitter, starring Dick Gregory as a Bird-type character.

The alto in this clip is George Coleman. Mal Waldren is the composer.
 

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Besides being a jazz freak I'm also a Trekkie :|...

From http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Vic_Fontaine:
Vic Fontaine was a 24th century Human hologram on Deep Space 9 created as part of a program simulating 1962 Las Vegas on Earth. He was a singer and entertainer who ran Vic's Las Vegas Lounge. Vic's program was modeled after popular mid-20th century entertainers such as Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. He had a repertoire of vocal-jazz era and cabaret songs that he performed with his band. Vic was played by actor and singer James Darren.

Here are some clips from YouTube:





Does anybody knows who the musicians are? According to this page they are unknown:
http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Bashir_62_holograms#Vic.27s_Lounge_band
 

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The plot of Song of the Thin Man is woven about the jazz scene in 1940s New York City. This isn't the best example, but you can get some idea.
The best scenes are the ones showing the late night jam sessions located in various fancy apartments throughout the city.
 

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The plot of Song of the Thin Man is woven about the jazz scene in 1940s New York City. This isn't the best example, but you can get some idea.
The best scenes are the ones showing the late night jam sessions located in various fancy apartments throughout the city.
Ooh. I always liked that one too. Wasn't that the last of the Thin Man Movies?
 

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Not one of the old classics which I love but here is a more modern one. Angel Eyes with Jim Caveezel and Jennifer Lopez where they go into the jazz bar and start dancing to In A Sentimental Mood. Jim's attention is on the trumpet......just watch. 2 great songs here. I can watch this movie over and over.
 

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Pot O Gold, starring Jimmy Stewart, features an unemployed jazz band and its battles with the neighborhood business tycoon.
 

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There are a couple of books on the subject:

1) http://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Movies-Guide-Musicians-1917-1977/dp/0870004034/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1316267684&sr=8-2

2) http://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Film-Complete-Musicians-Onscreen/dp/0879307838/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1316267782&sr=8-1

There is also a pair of excellent anthology CDs on the subgenre of "crime jazz":

1) Crime Jazz - Music in the First Degree

2) Crime Jazz - Music in the Second Degree

The music is from 50s and 60s movies and TV, and most of it is fairly raucous, Latin-tinged, composed big band stuff. Well worth a listen if you can stand more than a little blaring brass.
 
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