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Distinguished SOTW Member
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I bought this book recently and this really has been a revelation. The writer is an ethnomusicologist who wanted to do research on the great jazz artists learned how to play jazz. For his research he interviewed Kenny Barron, Doc Cheatman, Jerry Coker, Barry Harris and quite a lot more who I cant remember:mrgreen:.

It's really interesting to read that even tough everyone uses different methods that they share a great deal in common with each other. It's a bit extensive (800 pages) but it's only 23 dollars on amazon which is a bargain imho.

http://www.amazon.com/Thinking-Jazz-Infinite-Improvisation-Ethnomusicology/dp/0226043819
 

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Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
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Good tip!
 

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i agree it's a good book... i saw it in the library and read a large slab of it over that weekend... so i bought my own copy... the writing style is pleasant to read... i think footnote numbers referenced at the back make it an enjoyable read instead of all this/that in-text referencing...

another slightly left of field self help reference for me was the metallica doco 'some kind of monster' on dvd...
 

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+1000! I've had it since about '97. It's a great book. As a matter of fact, I haven't finished reading it yet. I had to start and stop many times, and in the process re-read chapters because I didn't want to pick up a chapter mid-way after a long hiatus. It's a very dense book. He could have thinned out some of his academic verbiage, I think. To me, its about the closest many of us can get to picking the brains of the "old school" cats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
+1000! I've had it since about '97. It's a great book. As a matter of fact, I haven't finished reading it yet. I had to start and stop many times, and in the process re-read chapters because I didn't want to pick up a chapter mid-way after a long hiatus. It's a very dense book. He could have thinned out some of his academic verbiage, I think. To me, its about the closest many of us can get to picking the brains of the "old school" cats.
Yeah I agree he repeats himself at some times and the fact that he is a trumpet player is pretty apparent, but despite it's flaws it's still a great book. I totally agree about the old school cats part, I was really looking for something like this.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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That's what I really like about this forum , I could have missed this easily ,thanks for the tip, looks VERY intersting..
 

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Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2012-2015
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Thank you, I just ordered one.
 

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I might be very interested in this. Usually, we interview the greats and leave their words to speak for themselves, because the music should. But what's best for knowing the music isn't always what's best for knowing the thought and doing behind it.

It's good that someone has tried to interpret and expand on the often non-verbal, tacit learning we do in music. If it's too jargony, actually, it may (ironically) help the work to be accepted in musicology, which too often doesn't know what to do with jazz and keeps it arm's length away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I might be very interested in this. Usually, we interview the greats and leave their words to speak for themselves, because the music should. But what's best for knowing the music isn't always what's best for knowing the thought and doing behind it.

It's good that someone has tried to interpret and expand on the often non-verbal, tacit learning we do in music. If it's too jargony, actually, it may (ironically) help the work to be accepted in musicology, which too often doesn't know what to do with jazz and keeps it arm's length away.
It's not so much about the music itself but more the way they learned and aproach playing.
 

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Ingrid Monson's _Saying Something: Jazz Improvisation and Interaction_ covers some of the same ground as Berliner's _Thinking in Jazz_. It's been a good while since I read it, but I remember perusing the two books simultaneously and liking them both immensely.

-j.
 

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It's not so much about the music itself but more the way they learned and aproach playing.
OK, maybe it's for music ed more than musicology. That's cool too - jazz education could use some fresh currents.
 

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I received the book today. It's a huge book! I can wait to read it (it's going to take a while to finish it, though). Will report back with my impressions when I'm done.
 
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