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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been playing saxophone for 5 years now (wow, that time flies), and my current mouthpiece is a Selmer c*. I also have a Selmer metal jazz c*, but I don't find myself using it that much. I play on a Yani a991 with Vandoren zz reeds, and the hard rubber c* just doesn't sound 'jazzy' enough. Does anyone have any favorites/suggestions?
 

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The first question is what tonal palate are you interested in? Without this information there are dozens of choices. A price range and naming a couple of players whose tone you gravitate towards would be helpful in offering input. Otherwise you will get advice from all angles. Some may not apply to where you want to be headed. Its about the music, not the mouthpiece. Start from that premise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As for price, it's an investment, so I'm very open-minded. I haven't really found "my" sound yet, but I can say that Charlie Parker had an amazing tone. I wouldn't mind heading that direction.
 

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Hi there,

Well Parker played on a Brilhart mouthpiece as far as I know, but there are still many people that swear by a Meyer. Meyer 5 or 6 is probably a good bet. I am in jazz mouthpiece transition myself, but I enjoy the Vandoren V16 alto mouthpieces a lot. Either an A5 or A6 would be another option. I find them to have a clearer & more versatile tone than the current meyers being made. As far as price, Ted Klum makes very good mouthpieces, but they will run you into the 200-350 dollar range for sure....
 

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Pacosax: I use a Selmer C* HR piece on alto and jazz is all I play, and have been doing so for over 50 years. I have a box of alto pieces with many brands and types, including two Meyers. But not too long ago, I tried a new thing for me and put a Fibracell 1 1/2 reed on the C* and that was the answer I'd been seeking. Another guy I played with a while back also used a C* and he was a wonderful player (on a vintage alto, don't recall which brand). So, before you go on the BIG HUNT, you may want to try a few reed changes. DAVE
 

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I find myself again here: When I was 16 I knew I wanted something different from my Yamaha 4C alto piece, but I had no clue where to go (pre internet etc!). The guys at the local music store told me about Otto Link and Berg-Larsen, and I ordered one STM for my alto and a metal Berg for my tenor. Took years to figure out what I really wanted later, so Sigmund/Phil; Pacozax may be in the same position, so I don't think he really knows where to go from the 4C and the C*. I can only recommend Phil's Phil-Tone Custom Meyer for alto or the Phil-Tone Custom Link for the tenor. They are both fantastic mouthpieces that will take you several steps further on your way to a personal sound!
 

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jazz, rock, funk, fusion and gospel on tenor, alto and soprano
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As a first jazz mouthpiece, or even for an experienced professional, I would highly recommend the Meyer 6M. It has a larger tip opening than the Selmer C*, which produces a louder, brighter tone with a jazzy edge that I love. The C* with its small tip opening is designed to produce a softer, mellower tone that blends in with the band. This is desirable when playing classical music, but I find it does not provide the volume, projection and edgy tone that I prefer when playing jazz. But it is close enough to the Selmer C* that it shouldn't take very long to adjust to this mouthpiece (as opposed to switching to a metal mouthpiece, which can be difficult to adjust to). I find the Meyer sounds best with the ZZ 3's, but any Vandoren reed I've used with it sounds good. I've also had good results with the Rico Jazz Select 3M's. I know many swear by expensive vintage or higher end Meyer mouthpieces, but I've had excellent results with the Meyer 6M that I purchased for 85 bucks at Sam Ash. I often find myself using the Meyer in preference to much more expensive mouthpieces I've tried.
 

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"Play the music, not the instrument" applies to the mouthpiece as well.
Jazz is a style, an attitude. Not a mouthpiece, reed, or brand of saxophone.
The jazz greats didn't use 'jazz' mouthpieces. They used what you may consider 'classical' pieces. There's no denying that they sounded pretty 'jazzy'.

First you have to get the 'sound concept' in your head. Then you can take your horn to your favourite shop and try every 'jazz' mouthpiece they have.
If you're lucky you'll find one that gives you what you are looking for.
 
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