Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Terrific experience with Jack Finucane / Boston Sax. This guy is the Real Deal. Let's start with the fact that before Jack became a sax dealer/restorer/technician, he himself was a highly skilled saxophonist, earning a Master's in Saxophone Performance from the distinguished New England Conservatory of Music.

Needless to say, he takes his craft very seriously.

The first part was working with Jack to help decide which sax to buy. He has an extensive selection of 40-50 vintage saxes, ranging from a $2000 Yamaha to a $20,000 vintage Selmer. He also carries new Yamaha and Ishimori saxes.

I opted for a Yamaha Custom Z based on its sound/playability, especially after Jack explained its strong resale value, we're I ever decidedly to sell or trade my sax.

Fast forward about a year to today, and I'm sitting in his workshop while he does a free 30 minute sax tune-up, one of three annual tune-ups that Jack provides to his customers of new saxophones (one year on vintage sales).

Such a pleasure! Thanks Jack!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,040 Posts
I guess there’s not much resale meat on the bone on a $20,000 Selmer.
I don’t see the resale value of a Yamaha unless you got it really cheap which I doubt from a dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,241 Posts
Getting three free annual tune-ups is a nice sweetener, and the kind of thing that local shops should offer to compete for the business of new-horn buyers, who otherwise tend to focus on the lower prices of far-away online dealers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,247 Posts
Getting three free annual tune-ups is a nice sweetener, and the kind of thing that local shops should offer to compete for the business of new-horn buyers, who otherwise tend to focus on the lower prices of far-away online dealers.
Not sure that would be sufficient, though. Where I am, a tune-up ranges from $65-$100. On the high end, that would be $300 total. I could save around $800-$1,000 by going with say, Matthew's Muziek, compared to US dealers, even more when you factor in sales tax. I still don't understand how there can be such a huge disparity in pricing. Even products that are made in the US are cheaper when bought from European outfits compared to US ones. For instance, I was able to buy Oleg risers and other accessories for around $20 each less from a German retail shop than I would have paid to the US shop that offered them for the lowest price.

The irony is that I have to wait 2 weeks because they are on back order and they need to put in an order for the items (presumably will be coming from the US) before they can ship it out to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,835 Posts
Not sure that would be sufficient, though. Where I am, a tune-up ranges from $65-$100. On the high end, that would be $300 total. I could save around $800-$1,000 by going with say, Matthew's Muziek, compared to US dealers, even more when you factor in sales tax. I still don't understand how there can be such a huge disparity in pricing. Even products that are made in the US are cheaper when bought from European outfits compared to US ones. For instance, I was able to buy Oleg risers and other accessories for around $20 each less from a German retail shop than I would have paid to the US shop that offered them for the lowest price.

The irony is that I have to wait 2 weeks because they are on back order and they need to put in an order for the items (presumably will be coming from the US) before they can ship it out to me.
That really illustrates how F'd up our world has become on a few different levels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,759 Posts
Maybe Mathews' is getting a volume discount from the manufacturers. I don't think the difference in prices is taxes unless the US is putting higher tariffs on horns than Netherlands. I've always thought of European taxes as being higher given most of the EU countries have VAT added onto most goods. If anyone knows the answer I'd like to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
Not sure that would be sufficient, though. Where I am, a tune-up ranges from $65-$100. On the high end, that would be $300 total. I could save around $800-$1,000 by going with say, Matthew's Muziek, compared to US dealers, even more when you factor in sales tax. I still don't understand how there can be such a huge disparity in pricing. Even products that are made in the US are cheaper when bought from European outfits compared to US ones. For instance, I was able to buy Oleg risers and other accessories for around $20 each less from a German retail shop than I would have paid to the US shop that offered them for the lowest price.

The irony is that I have to wait 2 weeks because they are on back order and they need to put in an order for the items (presumably will be coming from the US) before they can ship it out to me.
Prices are set by manufacturers and distributors. We have a set price we cannot go below. The distributors of each brand are different around the world. Yanagisawa for example is distributed by Conn-Selmer in the USA and the price is set by them, not us. Same with Yamaha, Selmer and every other brand sold by any company in the US.

So it's not by choice that it happens to be cheaper in Europe. It sucks actually.

On a side note, some of the prices I see on sites like Matthews is what we pay for the item!!!!

If we sell below dealer set pricing we loose our dealership.

Its a lose lose.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
Re: Jack Finucane / Boston Sax Shop: Great Buy & Service Experience

Maybe Mathews' is getting a volume discount from the manufacturers. I don't think the difference in prices is taxes unless the US is putting higher tariffs on horns than Netherlands. I've always thought of European taxes as being higher given most of the EU countries have VAT added onto most goods. If anyone knows the answer I'd like to know.
Volume discounts don't exist with horns and are very minimal with accesories. See post above about prices being set.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,759 Posts
So then why are prices higher in the US? Do the manufacturers think we can afford the higher price more than the Europeans? Maybe that's so for the coastal big city Americans. Not so for the rest of us. They're killing their own market by overpricing their product based on what people in San Francisco, LA or NYC can afford. I live 80 miles east of SF and wages are about 75% of SF wages. Maybe they don't understand the fine points of the US economy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
Re: Jack Finucane / Boston Sax Shop: Great Buy & Service Experience

So then why are prices higher in the US? Do the manufacturers think we can afford the higher price more than the Europeans? Maybe that's so for the coastal big city Americans. Not so for the rest of us. They're killing their own market by overpricing their product based on what people in San Francisco, LA or NYC can afford. I live 80 miles east of SF and wages are about 75% of SF wages. Maybe they don't understand the fine points of the US economy.
Your guess is as good as mine on that front. Ive been an advocate to equalize prices globally for a while and I've even talked with the distributors about it to no avail.

My only guess is that when they implimented this pricing scheme the Euro was much more valuable compared to the dollar so the equation has been thrown off due to the Euro dropping dramatically over the last 10 years. I could be wrong though.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,040 Posts
Why is healthcare free in Europe and everywhere else while people here go bankrupt when they get sick? Why does insulin cost ten times as much here as Canada? I had a friend go to India for oral surgery. I knew a singer who went to Venezuela for her plastic surgery. There’s a city in Mexico they call “Molar City” because of the number of Americans who go there for dental work.
Shop locally is becoming a thing of the past. Now it’s shop globally even for medical procedures
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
Joined
·
4,125 Posts
Prices are set by manufacturers and distributors.
You set the price for TM horns then - correct?

So then why are prices higher in the US? Do the manufacturers think we can afford the higher price more than the Europeans? Maybe that's so for the coastal big city Americans. Not so for the rest of us. They're killing their own market by overpricing their product based on what people in San Francisco, LA or NYC can afford. I live 80 miles east of SF and wages are about 75% of SF wages. Maybe they don't understand the fine points of the US economy.
They understand fine and just want to make more money.

Why is healthcare free in Europe and everywhere else while people here go bankrupt when they get sick?
For a very simple reason: health care in the US focuses on serving insurance companies and providers; elsewhere it is the patient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
You set the price for TM horns then - correct?
I don't personally, but yes, we have standardized pricing and charge dealers everywhere in the world the same price equally. We also ask them not to market cheaper than certain prices depending on the model.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,241 Posts
Not sure that would be sufficient, though.
Of course it's not sufficient if a price comparison is the only factor. But some buyers (a) want to see and handle the specific horn they may buy, before they buy it; (b) place a high value on personal service; and (c) wish to support local businesses if at all possible. For such buyers (who may be increasingly scarce, I admit), what I described as a "sweetener" may provide the necessary inducement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,241 Posts
So then why are prices higher in the US? Do the manufacturers think we can afford the higher price more than the Europeans?
These days, demand for high-quality wind instruments in the United States is probably pretty inelastic. That is, reducing the wholesale price substantially would not lead to sufficient additional sales to increase the overall profit. The current prices here are probably the distributors' best estimates of the "whatever the market will bear" prices. It used to be that in order to beat this system, you had to find a "gray market" retailer that was acquiring inventory overseas and then selling it within the U.S. for less than what the national distributors would allow dealers to charge. But with the Internet, any half-motivated consumer can simply buy directly from the lower-priced international sources.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
Joined
·
4,125 Posts
We also ask them not to market cheaper than certain prices depending on the model.
Are you saying not to list for less or sell for less?

Not sure I ever really understood this from a manufacturer perspective. If they get their set price for sending the horn to a dealer, why does it matter that the dealer discounts? Surely more sales should help the manufacturer.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
Re: Jack Finucane / Boston Sax Shop: Great Buy & Service Experience

Are you saying not to list for less or sell for less?

Not sure I ever really understood this from a manufacturer perspective. If they get their set price for sending the horn to a dealer, why does it matter that the dealer discounts? Surely more sales should help the manufacturer.

Thanks.
We personally ask them not to list it for less.

Allowing stores to list for less than a certain price really screws up the market because then you get the guy that will be willing to make $100 on every horn to sell his $1000 cheaper than everyone.

Forcing all stores to have a minimum listed price puts everyone on an equal playing field.

What stores actually sell them for at the end of the day is up to them and doesn't ultimately matter. If they choose to make a $100 profit only, that is there perogative, but not allowing them to advertise as such on the internet is vital for all dealers.

Before the advent of the internet and shipping horns, this didn't matter much at all, but it is a huge problem now a days and can really hurt small businesses that care to get quality products and not just push a box out the door a thousand times a day.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Forum Contributor 2013-2019
Joined
·
1,010 Posts
And now back to our original program....

Jack is a great tech and a monster player. I had him overhaul my custom Z and he did a great job. I bring my Z and my VI to him for general TLC once or twice a year, and they always play way better after just a few minutes on his bench.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,103 Posts
Jack is a great technician. He works hard at providing quality accessories and equipment. I'm very glad he came along right after Ernie Sola and Emilio..........
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top