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Selmer MarkVII Tenor
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Discussion Starter #1
The cork in my Selmer Mark VII does no cover the initial end of the neck and there is a smaller diameter than the cork diameter ... Does this affects the sound production ? It looks like the internal size of the chamber can be affected ... what is your opinion ?
I have a Yamaha YTS-275 and in its neck the cork cover the tip of the neck ... see the second image
 

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Discussion Starter #2
here it is another image :
 

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Some repair tech's will put cork over that end ring, leaving it very thin at the tip/end due to the added circumference of the ring, but I'm pretty certain it was "exposed" from the factory and that's how I do those corks (with the end ring) when I replace them.
I'll also add that whoever replaced that cork in posts 1 and 2 did a craptacular job, leaving that much contact cement on the ring. Talk about a half-a**ed job. Shame, shame.
 

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normal
 

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The length is OK but the re-corking job is very very poor, as already mentioned by @jgreiner. Not just the remaining contact cement; also the finishing/sanding of the cork.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Another opinions , here in this thread :
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...lmer-neck-cover-the-quot-end-ring-quot-or-not
So, do I need to remove the excess contact glue , and leave the end ring clean ?
It would be very interesting to view pictures of “ replacement necks” that are sold to replace the original necks in Selmers, especially Mark VII. Do they have this end ring too, as the original Selmer neck have ? Or are they “ better “ because they do not have that ring ?
 

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The ring is neither better or worse. Its common to a lot of selmer necks and horns. To me the cork does not look loke the greatest quality either but it will last as long as it lasts. Just clean it up and dont sweat it. Its not worth onsessing about IMHO.
 

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Earlier Selmers did come from the factory with the reinforcing ring covered, and the cork was nicely trimmed at a slight bevel all around the tip. The only reason it would be not covered is the cork over the ring would be very thin if the cork were to be trimmed down to fit a small-shank mouthpiece. Since modern saxes all come with the ring exposed, meaning there is no importance in having the cork cover the ring, there's no need to try to cover the ring anymore. If its already done, there's no need to trim it back. In short, this means it doesn't matter either way. Sometimes, just to be contrary, I cover the ring on my own horns if the mouthpiece has a larger bore and the cork doesn't have to be so thin over the ring.
 

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Selmer MarkVII Tenor
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Discussion Starter #10
accordying to this image , the cork is not covering the ring , but it is just a little away from the ring, and there is an empty space between the ring and the cork that is fillet with the adhesive used to glue the cork...
Do I need to send the neck to recork in order to get the cork closer to the ring, or it does not matter ?
many thanks for your information ..this is one of the reason I like this forum, many gentle and collaborative people ( and skilled )
thanks, again
 

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+1 to “it doesn’t matter.”

Play it as it is until you need to replace the cork, then talk about it with your tech. As others have noted, if your favorite mouthpiece has a small bore, a thin layer of cork over the ring will likely chip or peel more easily.

+1 also to the observation that the existing cork looks like it is shot, but if it works well for you and your mouthpiece, play on.
 

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+1 to “it doesn’t matter.”

Play it as it is until you need to replace the cork, then talk about it with your tech. As others have noted, if your favorite mouthpiece has a small bore, a thin layer of cork over the ring will likely chip or peel more easily.

+1 also to the observation that the existing cork looks like it is shot, but if it works well for you and your mouthpiece, play on.
^Here^
If your mouthpiece still fits snugly on the cork, play on. IF you want to remove the excess contact cement, go for it. If not, I'm sure it will continue to play just fine. I'd never let a shoddy recork job like that leave my bench, but that's just me.
 

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What is that "gunk" on the ring in front of the cork? I keep looking at it and can't tell. Also that cork looks like it is "begging" to have its pores filled with paraffin wax.
Pretty certain it's contact cement and I wholly agree about the paraffin!
 

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dried up contact cement
 

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Pretty much like my VI neck.
My cork does nt go to the end either,and it s the way it is suppose to be,so no worries.
All the best
Saxobari
 

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I had my Ref 54 serviced recently. The tech installed a new cork over the ring. Initially the ring was exposed. Don't hear much of a difference in the tone of my horn.
 

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It wont make a difference but as mentioned, it does offer a thinner area where the cork can begin tearing. I prefer the ring exposed for that reason. I put a lot of miles on a cork fast testing mouthpieces.
 

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There are knowledgeable technicians/players/teachers who insist that when the neck cork doesn't go all the way to the end of the neck (doesn't cover the ring) it can cause problems. Thinking logically, my opinion is this:

A. Leaving the ring uncovered creates a small crevice around the ring inside the saxophone bore where the neck meets the mouthpiece. Any change in the dimensions of the inside of a saxophone can, theoretically, affect the way the horn plays.
1. It's a very small change, but it is near .the beginning of the bore, where changes can have a greater effect.
2. Any change may have positive or negative results

B. Practically speaking, corking over the ring results in very thin cork at the tip of the neck
1. If the mouthpiece shank has a comparatively large internal diameter, the cork over the ring will be thicker and stronger. Maybe a good idea because the crevice created by no cork on the ring will be bigger - greater chance of perceivable effects, good or bad.
2. If the mouthpiece is fairly tight, the effects of cork or no cork, good or bad, would be less. The consequences one way or the other are minimized

C. There are some mouthpiece/neck combinations that prevent the saxophone from tuning up to correct pitch if the ring is covered with cork. I suspect this is why some manufacturers leave the ring exposed.

What do I do? If corking to the end of the neck, over the ring, leaves enough cork at the tip so that the cork is not paper-thin, I cork over the ring. I like the idea of a smooth transition from mouthpiece to neck, with no crevice where gremlins like to hide. On the other hand, some of the best manufacturers leave the neck ring exposed.
 

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If the horn plays well and the mouthpiece is secure, leave it. As 'saxoclese' said some paraffin wax wouldn't go amiss.....
 
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