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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I recently bought a '53 Conn 6M and it came with some case goodies. I am trying to identify this mouthpiece and thought some of you Conn experts could help me.

I don't see any markings on it but it is worn so that's not to say it didn't originally have some. Can you help me with this?

View attachment 229388 View attachment 229390
 

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1. I speak under correction, but assert that Conn never made any mpcs. Whatever you have, since it is not even marked "Conn" it could only be called such by a stretch if it happened to be included in the case new when a Conn was purchased. Conn contracted out to have various mpcs (runyon, for example) included with the horns they sold.

2. I have a few of this style and believe them to be of Babbit manufacture from roughly the 20s. I think that they were included with new horns back then. I had one included with my purchase of a Conn NWII C melody horn. It had no markings on it, either.

3. I am not a Conn expert.
 

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I have a tenor MP that looks very much like that and is ever-so-faintly marked "Conn" with an eagle emblem. I believe these were made sometime in the 1920s or early 30s, by whom I don't know, thus probably not contemporary with your conn 6M from the 1950s.

If you are used to more-modern pieces you probably will find it stuffy and dull sounding, kind of like playing a tennis ball instead of a mouthpiece. I have fooled around with my similar tenor piece, adding baffles and such, and managed to make it sound stuffy and dull sounding but also real prone to squeaking and chirping.

What will really work superbly well on your 6M (not that you actually asked this) would be a Meyer, Selmer Soloist, or Brilhart, or modern knock-off of one of those designs.

I don't know whether Conn ever made saxophone mouthpieces, far back in the days when vertical integration was seen as a positive for businesses rather than the current management fad of outsourcing everything. But the whole Conn company was founded on an innovative cornet mouthpiece, so I wouldn't rule it out.

Did Babbitt even exist in the 1920s?
 

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Thanks for the replies. Turf3- I actually play a Meyer 6m with it and it works great. I just love the sound.
I play a 10mfan Robusto on my tenor and was thinking of trying a Daddy -O with the alto. The Robusto is the best mpc I have ever played.

But I would love to figure out what this mpc is. If anyone has a clue please let me know.
 

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Did Babbitt even exist in the 1920s?
Barely, according to history in their website: "Since the first mouthpiece order was made in 1919 in the garage of founder Jesse James Babbitt, the company has focused on craftsmanship as the key to progressive mouthpieces. After learning his trade at Buescher Band Instruments in Elkhart, Indiana, Jessie went into business for himself. With the help of his brother, Rollie Babbitt, Jessie's idea became reality."
 

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Thanks click. I don't see any eagle at all on it. Could have worn away. Is that the only mpc that looks like this or is there another mpc that is similar?
 

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It looks like most mouthpieces from 1910-32.

2. Who was making them?

3. I did seem to me that if one goes back far enough, this design with that heavy wire band at the shank end is nearly ubiquitous.

1. What is going on with these numbers being out of order?

D. Getting another cup of coffee now.
 

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I'd say it's an old Conn mouthpiece from the 1920s. It's just like a 1923 Conn C-tenor mouthpiece I have, complete with metal ring on the shank, which has the Eagle stamped on the back. I've another Conn tenor mouthpiece from the late 1920s (made without a shank ring) on which the Eagle can only just be made out — it's been worn away over the years. This one looks to have had some emblem stamped on the back, which is now illegible. You could try wiping the back of the piece with light key-oil to see if that brings up the old stamping. Who made these mouthpieces for Conn I don't know - probably some maker who produced mouthpieces for several saxophone companies, e.g., J.J. Babbitt & co., as has been suggested above, by click. It has no great value, by the way.
 

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Looks like a 50s one to me....not sure however.
Possible. I was told by the first and, at that time, only owner of the horn that it was the one that came with it when he bought it new in 1935, and he had later bought a Brilhart that also came with the horn (when I bought it). Memories can fade over an 80 year period.
 
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