Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
Tenor, but seems to be in a rough condition. Maybe pull down neck too...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
Actually that looks like it could be a C melody.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,949 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,950 Posts
Look at area below thumb rest. Find serial number, above # May have letter “C”= C melody. Looks like one.
You looking to buy it ? Family item ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,735 Posts
Yours might be a smell-ody, but mine is a C Tenor, as labelled and intended by the inventor himself! so there.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,950 Posts
The "C" in the serial number did not appear on Bueschers but common on Conn.
Thanks Bruce I did not know that. I just assumed that was common trade practice throughout all manufactures.
Would it be fair to say if this is a melody C it should measure around 24 inches bow to tenon ? Alto 22” tenor 29”
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,268 Posts
Agree with Bruce. My Buescher TT C-Melody has the serial number in a curved line, below that is the TrueTone logo, below that is the trademark stuff, and below that is "Low Pitch."

I've had three TT Bb sopranos and an Eb alto TT, none of which had the key-designation on them. Conn, on the other hand will have a letter to designate the key of the horn, as well as an "L" or an "H" to designate the pitch.

I also agree that the horn pictured in the opening thread is a C-Melody, but those things I've found are bit difficult to compare to tenors without a frame of reference in measurements. The neck was a "tell" for me.

I also agree with PigSquealer about the measurements although I don't recall the exact numbers involved. But that is probably the best test for determining the key, as well as playing it against a tuned piano or other known source. DAVE
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,023 Posts
Could be worth $75 however.
Only if it plays, which I highly doubt, just looking at it. If you have to put several hundred dollars into it to get it in playing condition, not such a good deal. I wouldn't touch it. You can do much better...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
21,034 Posts
Thanks Bruce I did not know that. I just assumed that was common trade practice throughout all manufactures.
Would it be fair to say if this is a melody C it should measure around 24 inches bow to tenon ? Alto 22” tenor 29”
Correct on those measurements.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,950 Posts
Thanks Bruce I did not know that. I just assumed that was common trade practice throughout all manufactures.
Bruce & Dave, I have no idea where I got the assumption that all horns were marked with an A,C or T. I just looked at all 11 horns I own and only one is marked. Just like you said Bruce the Conn. ‘22 New Wonder 1 C,LP. Without hijacking the thread is there a place to learn the interpretation of the nomenclature on the sax. Terminology and anatomy of a saxophone would be a good thing to have on the beginners form too....unless I’ve overlooked that too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,735 Posts
Only if it plays, which I highly doubt, just looking at it. If you have to put several hundred dollars into it to get it in playing condition, not such a good deal. I wouldn't touch it. You can do much better...
Well before we make a declaration and accept it, lets look at some data.

First, it looks like a Buescher, looks complete, no obvious dents or bends, finish looks like its an original bare brass model, and looks like it has a period matching C me...I mean C tenor mouthpiece. Lets assume it has the original case in good condition. Many C melody consumers believe Bueschers were the best ones. Assume its a good candidate for an overhaul.

If you don't want a C melody, its worth 0$ to you. But instead, lets look at the market value, which isn't what you will pay, or what I will pay, or even what we will pay - its what the market will pay. The market (folks that want a C melody) are paying around $150 for these in great, restorable condition. Overhauled new, that market is paying around $6-700. Its a small market. Not a good candidate for speculators. But a market nonetheless.

I'll point out, that a new $500 pair of men's red leather shoes are worth exactly 0$ to me. I wouldn't walk across the street, if you promised them to me for free. And I desperately need some new shoes, and willing to pay a considerable amount, if I like them enough. But someone will buy those shoes, perhaps discounted, for a lot more than my assessed value.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician
Joined
·
25,998 Posts
Definitely C Melody. You can tell by the alternate F#, which wraps around the back of the body. Buescher tenors have the "spoon" alternate F# which runs parallel between the side keys and RH keys. Late Buescher C Melodies can also have the spoon alt. F#, but they are rare, and this ain't one of them (doesn't have the front F key).
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,268 Posts
Jim: You are spot-on about things that few people want - those red shoes, for instance. There may be someone out there who wants those red shoes (or in this thread's case, an awful old C-Melody saxophone) but finding the buyer is the problem.

I have a pretty nice Buescher C-Mel that I couldn't sell. It sat on consignment at a local store for a couple of years, then I brought it home and it sits in my closet. I just haven't come across that one person who wants a C-Mel (and I am not willing to put any time into marketing it, packing it for shipment, etc.). I'm okay with my decedents dealing with it after I'm gone.

I for one would not put ANY time into the horn pictured in the opening post. Even if totally refurb'd, the horn may sit for years without any interest. In the shape it is in now, maybe a chain-coffee-shop would hang it on the wall - if it was gifted to them. DAVE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,735 Posts
I brought it home and it sits in my closet.
I think we know why its not selling ;) Looks like (9) c mels have sold on Ebay since March 30, ranging from $150 to $700. Looks like I got it right, the market is around $150-$200 for an exceptional restorable candidate, with a newly restored excellent condition horn going for $600-$700. If yours is playable, put it on Ebay. If its not playable, put it on Ebay. Price it to 90% of market, and be patient. It will sell.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top