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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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C mel, in very bad state and badly affected by what's known as " Red Rot" (not as bad as it sounds), there is damaged neck and some damage by the bow.In my opinion not worth bothering.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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It would cost more to get playing than it is worth.

One way to tell is the height of the bell

On a C melody it comes to above the top of the pinky cluster, level with the G touchpiece.

On a tenor it comes to the bottom of the pinkly cluster
 

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A true tone C melody has the large key guard directly above the r.h. thumb rest ( almost touching ) , a Bb tenor dosn't....it's a C mel ( picture #2 )
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey thanks guys,you did help a lot,now I'll take back on what I want to bid on this horn,so did anyone play a True-Tone tenor here?What's mouthpiece and reeds setup?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
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I've got 2 T-T tenors (vintages 1925 and 1932). I use a wide variety of setups with them - nothing but the biggest baffle rock/funk pieces are really off limits. They do require some conscious voicing to stay in tune, but less so than T-T altos.

Favorite mpcs include metal Link STM, rubber Meyer M, vintage Brilhart (Ebolin, Tonalin or rubber), NY Woodwind rubber, and of course the stock Buescher "ring shank" and the Sigurd Rascher piece modeled after it. Alexander Superial reeds on all (very responsive), anywhere from 2 1/2 to 4, getting harder as the tip openings get smaller.
 

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You must have your mysterious reasons to want to buy an old beater like this.

I understand that on Taiwan you might have access to many saxophones technicians or maybe you are one yourself but it won't be easy to fix a sax like this (the neck and the bow are bot very complex jobs). With a bit of patience and a bit more of money you could by a very good example silver plated with a gold wash bell, no dents and only needing new pads or perhaps not even that.

Anyway the ergos and the lack of front F in this horn make it way less popular than the straight neck C melody Conn for example.

Anyway I had one , it played well with a range of tenor mouthpieces metal or ebonite.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You must have your mysterious reasons to want to buy an old beater like this.
No other reason,just like a vintage sax that looked bad,kind of a weird habbit I think. :p
I'm just a kid want to try some more vintage horns,but it's just so difficult in Taiwan,once I got a Conn Chu tenor but sold it(and yes,feel regret about it).The only one experience on Buescher is a friends of mine's 400 (late model I think),it did play well and got some differences form a Chu.So considering bid a cheap one to try out.Anyway thanks for helping,you guys rock!
 

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A true tone C melody has the large key guard directly above the r.h. thumb rest ( almost touching ) , a Bb tenor dosn't....it's a C mel ( picture #2 )
Huh. I've eyeballed hundreds of Buescher C-melody horns, and generally I can distinguish between a tenor & C-mel just by general proportions, but that's one detail I had never noticed on the Buescher C-mels & it is a dead giveaway.
 

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Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
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No other reason,just like a vintage sax that looked bad,kind of a weird habbit I think. :p
Spot on. Probably most of the SOTW membership can relate to that.
 

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Very late Buescher Cs (such as my 256xxx) have the same type "baby spoon" F# trill as the rest of the True-Tone family. But if you bought one of those by mistake, it would be a good thing! (It was for me!)
 
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