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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a bit confused, but think experts here will have an answer.
Based on the serial number (49XXX) this is a series II according to SaxPics, although it says the top serial for a 1a is 30XXX, but very approximate.
OK, say this is a 1a, SaxPics states these have G# Pearl button and straight tone holes. All the buttons on this beauty has metal buttons, and not sure about the tone holes.
Maybe the max number should be upped to 50xxx for the 1a?
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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I personally think the approximations on "series" are really only valid for tenors and altos -- and even then it's a loose association by features of those horns.

Sops, baris, and basses pretty much followed their own paths and may be quite a bit earlier in features or quite a bit later -- if ever. So, I don't think you can catagorize them as easily by Saxpics methodology.

A good example is on baris -- a True Tone Custom Built bari has all the Aristocrat features years before there were Aristocrat altos and tenors. Later baris were TT's that sort of mimic'd some of the 'crat' features, but didn't implement all of them.

Sops would follow on keywork and as near as I can tell had button G#'s well after the spatula changed for the altos and tenors. Buescher tenor fans will tell you that Big B tenors varied dramatically by year and don't even carry the same model number through the life of the engraving pattern that was used to catagorize these horns.

Point is, the catagories are approximates. Better than nothing to describe the vintage and a general set of features, but can't be consistently applied. Use them carefully, if at all.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
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It's a series 1A with soldered on tone holes. At that serial it should be a series II if we'd talking altos or tenors (even Baris). This particular example has a non original nickel plate beneath the silver wich makes me think aftermarket refinish and not done by anybody in the know of how musical instrument plating goes. You don't flash a horn (flash is a industry name for a thinner silver or gold plating over nickel) it creates worse pitting conditions than normal silver plate.
 
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