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Discussion Starter #1
I have a mouthpiece where I really don't want to do anything else to the baffle profile or facing curve but I feel like the chamber is larger than I like. Like stated I really don't want to alter the tone but would like have a little more resistance and more efficient air flow on the other end of the piece. The piece is made of brass. Are there any refacers that have ever found a way to add like epoxy or something on the inside of the chamber vs the baffle?
 

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If you like the tone and sound and the way it plays but need more resistance, go up a half-step in reed strength. What you're suggesting will change the sound of the mouthpiece. Its never about air flow - its all about acoustics. To restrict the throat of the mouthpiece so it literally would be harder to blow, you would be down to about a 5mm opening or less.
 

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I have a mouthpiece where I really don't want to do anything else to the baffle profile or facing curve but I feel like the chamber is larger than I like. Like stated I really don't want to alter the tone but would like have a little more resistance and more efficient air flow on the other end of the piece. The piece is made of brass. Are there any refacers that have ever found a way to add like epoxy or something on the inside of the chamber vs the baffle?
You know what I have used in the past, is to get some thin clear plastic you might find as a sheet protector at Staples. Cut it in strips and roll up a section of it. If it is rigid enough , the roll has a tension in it that pushes to the outside of the mouthpiece interior. Depending on how thick you want it you can put more or less in the roll. I tried it on a Link that I found really spread and it really focused the tone and made it into a totally different sounding mouthpiece. It takes it from a large chamber to a medium chamber. I found it fun to mess around with........
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You know what I have used in the past, is to get some thin clear plastic you might find as a sheet protector at Staples. Cut it in strips and roll up a section of it. If it is rigid enough , the roll has a tension in it that pushes to the outside of the mouthpiece interior. Depending on how thick you want it you can put more or less in the roll. I tried it on a Link that I found really spread and it really focused the tone and made it into a totally different sounding mouthpiece. It takes it from a large chamber to a medium chamber. I found it fun to mess around with........
Steve, I'm not clear with how to roll the plastic, like just to one side so it pushes or to roll the plastic in a cylinder inside the mouthpiece? Does it stay put? Material for the sheet protectors , shiny or the more grainy and opaque plastic?

Open to hear all other possible materials/options. Think I'm going to go by a Hobby Lobby soon and get both the Plasticine and sheet protectors to give it a try.
 

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Steve, I'm not clear with how to roll the plastic, like just to one side so it pushes or to roll the plastic in a cylinder inside the mouthpiece? Does it stay put? Material for the sheet protectors , shiny or the more grainy and opaque plastic?

Open to hear all other possible materials/options. Think I'm going to go by a Hobby Lobby soon and get both the Plasticine and sheet protectors to give it a try.
You just cut a strip like an inch wide and then roll the strip into a tight roll and stick it in the bore end of the mouthpiece. You then pushed it in with the eraser end of a pencil trying to get it up where you want it in the chamber. I'm looking around my office for what i used but can't seem to find it. It was clear thin like plastic. I believe I got it from a sheet protector but that memory is a bit vague. I'll post a photo if I can find it.........
 

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You just cut a strip like an inch wide and then roll the strip into a tight roll and stick it in the bore end. It was clear thin like plastic. I believe I got it from a sheet protector but that memory is a bit vague. I'll post a photo if I can find it.........
Does it interfere with cleaning the mouthpiece?
 

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Steve would using a metal or plastic washer(various internal diameters) from a hardware store work to reduce the chamber size?
 

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Steve would using a metal or plastic washer(various internal diameters) from a hardware store work to reduce the chamber size?
I don’t see how that would stay put. Plus washers are pretty thin and would only reduce the chamber in one thin area. But who knows, give a shot a let us know.


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You can put epoxy in but its hard to take out so be aware.

JVW used to paint the inside of Links with JB Weld. Reportedly over the long haul it can start to flake off.

Both stick to rough surfaces better.

Morgan says Plasticine. Ive never used it but the ability to remove it is a bonus. We have all seen pieces gunked up by epoxy.

If you want to sell it dont expect much...or many customers.
 

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I have a mouthpiece where I really don't want to do anything else to the baffle profile or facing curve but I feel like the chamber is larger than I like. Like stated I really don't want to alter the tone but would like have a little more resistance and more efficient air flow on the other end of the piece. The piece is made of brass. Are there any refacers that have ever found a way to add like epoxy or something on the inside of the chamber vs the baffle?
If you want more resistance, maybe reducing the chamber isn't the way to go.
 

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A smaller chamber will be more focused and may change your intonation from what you are used to. It will make the palm keys a little flatter after you tune the mid range. I doubt it will change the resistance much but you may get that sensation if the notes sound more focused.

Plasticine is Play-Doh I think. I use poster hanging mounting putty for tests. But it does not adhere well to a damp interior. So running a tissue through the mouthpiece is a necessary step. Dental wax or clay could be used. They will leave a residue to be cleaned out when done.

The hard part is shaping inside the chamber. I have several modeling tools that make the job easier.
 

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I have a mouthpiece where I really don't want to do anything else to the baffle profile or facing curve but I feel like the chamber is larger than I like. Like stated I really don't want to alter the tone but would like have a little more resistance and more efficient air flow on the other end of the piece. The piece is made of brass. Are there any refacers that have ever found a way to add like epoxy or something on the inside of the chamber vs the baffle?
OP, it's not clear what you're trying to do here.

"Efficient air flow" doesn't have any meaning in the context of a mouthpiece chamber; it's not a water pipe. The only place air flow would have any importance would be up near the tip of the reed where the air is traveling through a small slot. By the time it gets down into the MP chamber its velocity is so slow that it doesn't matter.

Let's say the average reed to MP tip gap is 1 mm and the reed is 12 mm wide so that would be a cross sectional area of 12 mm2. Now go down into the chamber and let's say it's 12 mm in diameter. That is a cross sectional area of 113 mm2, or round about ten times. So the air velocity in the chamber will be 1/10 that at the reed tip.

"Resistance" is a function of a whole bunch of different stuff, most of which I believe is going to be related to the reed itself, its interaction with the facing curve, and the baffle design especially near the tip.

I suspect that all else being equal (which it never is) a large chamber piece would have MORE "resistance" than a smaller one, all else being equal (which it never is).

Certainly there is no harm in fooling around with putting stuff into the MP to change effective chamber size, as long as you can remove it and clean up afterwards. But I suspect that you will get more of what you want from experimenting with reed choice and facing curves. Does your mouthpiece model come in a "short facing" variant?
 

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With the reed in motion, it is not even fully open all the time. At loud volumes it momentarily closes off. So the tip opening cross sectional area may be like 1/2 of what it is with the reed at rest.

You can blow a lot of air through your mouthpiece without making a sound. Try this with a large and small chamber mouthpiece to see if you can feel a difference in blowing resistance.

Mouthpiece (acoustic) resistance is mostly not due to pipe flow air resistance.
 

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If you can fool around adding some sort of material that you can easily remove, there's no harm in experimenting to see what you come up with. However, if you like the sound of the mpc now and it plays well, almost certainly anything you do (without really knowing what you're doing), will just make it worse. So don't put anything permanent in there unless you want to ruin the mpc.

Best strategy is try some other mpcs if you're looking for some specific characteristic that is lacking in the piece you have now.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for all the insights/views. Guess my wording was wrong and have a different idea of what resistance is when playing. I want to be able to keep the same tone core, maybe a little more projection without having to put as much air stream through the mouthpiece. Feels like the chamber is larger than I want and tiring to play a 4 hour gig on. I plan to do nothing at all with the mouthpiece, except possibly sell it. Compared to other players my oral cavity is a bit different since I had surgery several years ago where my uvula and some of my soft palate was removed. I have always favored more small/medium chamber mouthpieces and on occasion a large chamber if there is a higher baffle but most times too high of a baffle results in a tone I don't care much for. I wouldn't dream of using anything like JB Weld unless I found a shape that worked great for me in the prototype made of a material that is easily removed.
 
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