Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 20 of 53 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,908 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been playing a Barone Jazz tenor mpc for a year or so, got a case of GAS and picked up something different. It's in the same vein as the Jazz, metal/dark/Link-ish.

Intonation on the new piece is all over the place, and some notes sound "off" tone-wise, like an ultra-stuffy D#2.

If this were you, would you say "this piece sucks" or would you say "I need to give this piece a few weeks and see what I can do with it"? Also, probably need to try different reeds and what not I'm assuming.

I really want to like this piece... ever get a mpc in the mail, slap it on and feel disappointed? Do not like. Thoughts?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,908 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I'd rather not say what this piece is, as I don't want to disparage a piece if it's just something I need to adapt to. However, I will say, if this were a piece in a store and I was able to try it before buying... I wouldn't have =\
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
41,632 Posts
well one must not have a reason to try something new, but you must have a reason to stick to something new and that is that it impresses you and doesn't frustrate and tickles your curiosity. I think that if the new mouthpiece does nothing like that then it is not for you and for your horn.
Slight intonation and response problems could be something that you can work your way around to..........but you have like it enough to go through any adjusting. I have spent many useless months trying to like something that wasn't going anywhere. If the piece is not exciting you and you are more excited because of its name and price tag, drop it an go back to your old piece or move on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
I think that any Link style piece, especially actual Links, do have a period of adjustment to them. At first I usually don't like a new darker piece but after a while I learn how to voice them and they come alive. I'd give it two weeks of solid use and if its still bugging you I'd call the maker and ask some questions about it.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
6,862 Posts
I'd rather not say what this piece is, as I don't want to disparage a piece if it's just something I need to adapt to. However, I will say, if this were a piece in a store and I was able to try it before buying... I wouldn't have =\
I've often read on here the idea that the mouthpieces that sound great right away often turn out to be disappointing?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,908 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think that any Link style piece, especially actual Links, do have a period of adjustment to them. At first I usually don't like a new darker piece but after a while I learn how to voice them and they come alive. I'd give it two weeks of solid use and if its still bugging you I'd call the maker and ask some questions about it.
I guess even if the piece I've been playing for a year IS a Link style piece? I believe this new one has a larger chamber and an overall larger profile, so there may be an issue with comfort in my mouth/embouchure. I will say though that besides the intonation and stuffy D#2 it is very easy to play, especially down low... and that's one of the reasons I'm hoping it will work out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
I guess even if the piece I've been playing for a year IS a Link style piece? I believe this new one has a larger chamber and an overall larger profile, so there may be an issue with comfort in my mouth/embouchure. I will say though that besides the intonation and stuffy D#2 it is very easy to play, especially down low... and that's one of the reasons I'm hoping it will work out.
Yes, I think all Links style pieces have their own quirks and adjustments that have to be made. If you like the sound the ease of playing it's totally worth adjusting to and learning it's oddities. No mouthpiece is perfect!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
I think there's always adjustment from one jazz mouthpiece to another or one horn to another. In particular, I notice a huge difference in the feel if I switch from my larger profile, larger chamber mouthpiece to the medium chamber slimmer profile mouthpiece I used to play.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician
Joined
·
27,250 Posts
I really want to like this piece... ever get a mpc in the mail, slap it on and feel disappointed? Do not like. Thoughts?
Why do you really want to like the new mouthpiece? Looks or status? I mean... the piece plays terrible for you, so send it back or resell it and move on. Not every mouthpiece that we look forward to trying out is going to work with a specific horn. Sure, you can get used to playing anything, whether it be a horn or a mouthpiece; but why bother when there are always better alternatives available that are apparent right off the bat?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,908 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Why do you really want to like the new mouthpiece? Looks or status? I mean... the piece plays terrible for you, so send it back or resell it and move on. Not every mouthpiece that we look forward to trying out is going to work with a specific horn. Sure, you can get used to playing anything, whether it be a horn or a mouthpiece; but why bother when there are always better alternatives available that are apparent right off the bat?
Honestly I want to like it because I spent money on it and waited for it. My intention wasn't to get it and not get on with it. Would've been easier to just not buy it if that were the case, right? Plus it's received great reviews from others. Essentially, I'm wondering if it's me?
Also, this is not a stock piece, this is something I had sent off and "modified" if that changes anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,143 Posts
It can take ~3 weeks of regular playing on a new mouthpiece to really get to "know" it. You have to unlearn your current muscle memories that you have learned to favor response and intonation issues of a particular mouthpiece, and learn new muscle memories for a new mouthpiece. Ideally, the less issues a mouthpiece has, the more neutral of an embouchure you can use on it. This helps a lot if you are using several mouthpiece or double on several instruments.

So using a lot of muscle memory to make a mouthpiece work for you is not a good strategy IMO. But using some is a reality. Just be aware of it. Plus, you need to try out several reeds over the 3 week period.

Many players audition a mouthpiece for a few minutes and (think) they know whether it will work for them or not. You usually do need to hear or feel something in the response that makes you want to stick with it for a while. But spending money on it and waiting for it is also motivation to give it a longer trial.

A lot of players toss "bad" mouthpieces in a drawer and pull them out a year later and wonder why they put them there. What changed? Not the mouthpiece.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009-
Joined
·
2,765 Posts
Yeah, I'd say give it a little time. There are intricate subtleties in the musculature of the embouchure and it takes time to develop a new approach on a new piece. Try some different reeds from what you've been using as well. It's amazing how "reed fussy" some pieces are, especially the Linkish ones.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2012
Joined
·
7,215 Posts
probably need to try different reeds
... good rule of thumb ...start with new ones, used only on that mpc exclusively...
finding the right reed can be frustrating and expensive.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,908 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Have so far tried-

RJS 2H
ZZ 2.5
Fibracell med-soft

ZZ was perhaps a tiny bit better.

Appreciate everyone's insights so far, thank you
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Just to add a contrarian voice here: this might depend upon experience level, but I *generally* can get a solid idea of whether a piece will do it for me or not VERY quickly, as in within minutes of blowing on it... There are certain kinds of resistance a piece might have that can be a deal breaker for me, for example.

That said, I can't overstate the importance of having plenty of makes and strengths of reeds on hand for your tryout, because a piece that might seem utterly dead might come roaring to life with a softer or harder reed, or a reed cut differently...

Also remember, it may be a GREAT piece -- it just might not be a great piece FOR YOU! My "Holy Grail" tenor and alto pieces were picked up on SOTW, after being rejected by other players...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
6,862 Posts
this is something I had sent off and "modified" if that changes anything.
Different kind of teasing, but still teasing. I think we may have to get him drunk! :) :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
Put it in the drawer if you can afford to. You may like it a couple years down the road. If you need the cash for gear, sell it and move on.
 
1 - 20 of 53 Posts
Top