Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Forum Contributor 2015, seeker of the knowing of t
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At 2:21

https://youtu.be/FCNFmYoenmQ?t=140

It's like a broken triplet bit of a rock and roll kinda feel thing. I like it and would like to incorporate it into my stuff.

Cheers
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,467 Posts
It's just 8th notes but in a 3 note grouping. Here's what he plays (starting with the G# on the "and" of 1), all 8th notes (concert key):

| (8th note rest) G# A C G# A C G# | A C G# A C G# A C | etc.

If you're thinking of the chords (D7 and G7) as 2 beats each (slow), then it would just be 16th notes instead of 8th (I don't know the tune so I'm not sure if it's a fast 4 or not).

Hope that helped!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,361 Posts
Dave got it right, and I believe the pattern is in 16th notes rather than eighth notes. This is called a "hemiola" where the grouping of notes makes it sound as if the meter has changed, but it has not like "America" from West Side Story. This is how it looks written out, but in a different key.

 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,361 Posts
Hey Punter, I'm sure Dave and saxoclese have it right, from a technical standpoint. In a practical sense if you want to incorporate this into your playing, imo the way to do it is to play along and match the recording until you get the feel of it and totally absorb it. I sometimes use this rhythmic device and some others that I would find hard to notate, but when you get the feel of it you can play it.

That's a great tune, by the way. 'New Orleans style' rhythm.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2015, seeker of the knowing of t
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all, great responses!

I was really into the Treme series and I’m now in a band happy to do tunes with a second line feel so I need to get into this stuff!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
13,135 Posts
Yes, it's that New Orleans 2nd line feel. Search out a bunch of old skool N'awlins R&B. I love it. Search utoob for Wild Tchoupitoulas full album. It's really the Meters doing traditional and modern funky Mardi Gras Indians music. If you were into Treme, this is the go-to roots music.

When I saw the topic was "Is there a name for this rythmic device", i thought it was about cowbell. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,957 Posts
Hey Punter, I'm sure Dave and saxoclese have it right, from a technical standpoint. In a practical sense if you want to incorporate this into your playing, imo the way to do it is to play along and match the recording until you get the feel of it and totally absorb it. I sometimes use this rhythmic device and some others that I would find hard to notate, but when you get the feel of it you can play it.

That's a great tune, by the way. 'New Orleans style' rhythm.
Better yet, check out Professor Longhair aka Henry Byrd. Big Chief pretty much epitomizes the second line cadence.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbolafCdcqY

If you need words and moving images, check this one out by the Neville Brothers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_rAaRVRHfM

The '70's in New Orleans were wonderful years for me. The city (though teetering on economic collapse) was electric with music. There were clubs everywhere. Most of the venues made their money from the bar. Except on Bourbon Street, cover charges were nominal. Unbelievably, the Nevilles (maybe it was the Meters--- not the exact same group) had difficulty filling Tip's when they charged five bucks entry.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2015, seeker of the knowing of t
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Got close to it, but struggling with some of the nuances of emphasis in the example I posted
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top