Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Am I the only one that has noticed that sales of smaller tips, .95-105 for tenor for instance, going up?

Last year about this time, I thought I saw a lot of buyers interested in .110++ for tenor. Have not kept my eye on the altos as much because I've been happy with my alto for many years.

[edit] Sorry for the title. My iPhone decided that was what I was trying to say.
 

·
Undistinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
723 Posts
Re: I'd the trend from big tips going away?

Hmm, interesting. I thought I noticed a bit of a trend towards smaller tips and softer reeds, but I couldn't say for sure. For myself, I've never been very comfortable with the super wide tips that seemed to be all the rage in years past, where there seemed to be some kind of mini competition going on there. My latest mpc is a GW 7 (.100) and that's the biggest tip mpc I have so far. So I for one, find it reassuring that many people, even pros and top level players seem to be backing away from the 'superman' setups eg. .130 tips with #5 reeds. I know I couldn't even make a peep on such a setup!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
It has always perplexed me that so many people want the traditional or vintage sound out of their horns yet play with mouthpiece openings that the traditional or vintage player would not consider. Most of the older guys in my experience played with smaller mouthpiece openings than are used by todays player.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
I've noticed the trend, I think a combination of better sound systems, and a move back toward a 'more pleasing tone'--interpret as you wish!--may have something to do with it.
 

·
SOTW Administrator
Joined
·
26,207 Posts
I haven't noticed so much the tips getting smaller as the baffles getting lower.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
Walt Weiskopf seems to be playing on a #5* Otto Link (or some refaced model, on the pictures the mpc looks to me too shiny to be all original), and I think Joshua Redman plays a 7*, but apart from that I can't come up with any big names that play smaller than 8* openings.

There is a trend though that a lot of new mouthpiece makers that claim to "copy the vintage sound of the old Otto Links" produce mainly 7/7*/8/8* pieces, but I think that is more of a marketing decision: their product is geared towards people that hope to get that "vintage" sound just by spending a few bucks (rather than paying a good teacher or spending more time practicing on their air support).
 

·
SOTW Administrator
Joined
·
26,207 Posts
I use a relatively big tip (.120 link STM) on tenor so I can get a flexible sound that can be spread or focused, depending on how I voice and blow. I only get a focused sound with a small tip and hard reed.
I like a big tip on alto (.92 Meyer) because I want a darker sound than most alto players--more toward Kenny Garrett than Gary Foster.

On soprano and bari, I play a relatively small tip, because I quack like a duck on a wide tip on sop, and I hyperventilate on bari :)

I believe that younger players are doing some experimenting, and trying the smaller tip/harder reed, just to see if they can get the Getz sound, or the Coltrane sound. It's interesting to me that the 'knowledge' when I was in school (in the 70s) was that Coltrane played on an 8*. Now everyone says he played on a 5*.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
Well, for one thing, when I was trying to sound like Plas Johnson or David Fathead Newman, nothing helped me more than a playing on a 9* PPT with Rico 4's and sometimes even 5's (whatever were available). I was shocked to find myself playing on such heavy equipment :shock:

Recently I found out that it's Pete's skill :salute: that makes it possible to play a large variety of reeds on his pieces, though: in a wave of GAS I bought a Klum and a very nice vintage Link, both also 9*s, but I can only play them with much softer reeds (3's)....
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member.
Joined
·
1,526 Posts
Oh well, I didn't have my glasses on... The interest in big ti_s never goes away... The interest just starts to sag...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
Oh well, I didn't have my glasses on... The interest in big ti_s never goes away... The interest just starts to sag...
:faceinpalm: :)

Eugene illustrates the relativity of it all: small tips, big tips - there is only so much you can put in your mouth.....
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
21,033 Posts
I find a tip is too big when you cannot play softly down to low B or Bb without subtoning. I hear players using wide tips that can sound great but everything sounds exactly the same.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009-
Joined
·
2,759 Posts
I think there will always be a market for open mouthpieces because of their tonal flexibility but with the advent of widespread amplification not so much for sheer volume of sound.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,092 Posts
I think there will always be a market for open mouthpieces because of their tonal flexibility but with the advent of widespread amplification not so much for sheer volume of sound.
That's interesting. I always felt limited by a wide open mouthpiece. They seem to play two ways for me: subtone and too loud/buzzy. I've always gotten vastly more flexibility out of more moderate sizes. Probably just what I'm used to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,721 Posts
I think many R&B sax players will always use big tip openings because it's the easiest way to get that deep growly kind of sound you need for that style. Jazz players are finding major benefits to being in that 6*-7* range with a 4+ size reed. While subtoning takes some work, the high end and altissimo come out full and effortlessly, even on a low baffle piece. Listen to the altissimo chops of some of the guys playing this kind of setup like Seamus Blake, Mark Turner, Rick Margitza, etc.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
I am mainly using a Ponzol M2 110 Stainless most of the time. That seems to be a good opening for me on that mouthpiece. I still play around on my Berg 130/2, but I think reeds last longer on the smaller tipped Ponzol and altissimo is easier for me as well with the smaller opening. However,the Berg really is an easy mouthpiece to play at all volumes with a 2.5 reed. I also recently purchased and play a .100 Brilhart/ARB Great Neck Tonalin which is not as flexible as the Ponzol, but does a wonderful job playing standards. I like the 7* size STM NY Link better than my 5* NY STM.
So, I just play what works for me and really never have worried about any trends.
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,015 Posts
So, I just play what works for me and really never have worried about any trends.
Very wise of you, and I agree. I wasn't really aware of any particular trend one way or the other in terms of tip openings. Just a lot of different players using different set ups.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top