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(After weeks of thinking about it and considering opinions on SOTW) I got myself a YTS 23 brand new after two-and-a-half years of playing alto only. I’ve never played tenor before although I listen to a lot of tenor music.
After a day of playing it I’m surprised by how easy it is. I know the YTS 23 is a beginner’s horn but playing it seems so easy I’m worried I may be missing something.
1- I’m surprised how easily all the notes came out (from B-flat to high F-sharp). The stock 4C mouthpiece sounded pretty good with La Voz medium-soft. I use La Voz medium on my alto but thought it better to start on tenor with a softer reed. Now I’m thinking I should go to medium on tenor too but I think I’ll wait for a few weeks at least before changing.
2 - I had no problems playing pianisso and fortissimo, something I was able to do on alto only after some weeks of consistent practice.
3 - As far as fingering is concerned the YTS 23 is as light as my alto I can’t tell I’m playing a tenor unless I look at it.
4 – I thought tenor would be heavier alto but the YTS 23 doesn’t feel any heavier than my alto.
5- The size difference takes some getting use to but I don’t expect it to be a problem.
My only issues are:
1 - The huge coffin like case is heavier and takes up more room.
2 – It doesn’t fit too well into the Hamilton stand I use for my alto.
Now I have to learn to play in B-flat but overall I think it's great.:D
 

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keep in mind the fingerings are all the same, in basic reference, everything is the same.

So, since you have experience with the alto, then the tenor should be a piece of cake as you already have experience.

sometimes there are airstream/pressure issues with certain tenors on certain notes. As you get more experienced you may want a different tonal quality which can vary alot with tenors .... but don't worry about that at this point
go and enjoy .....
 

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Saxmusiclover said:
My only issues are:
1 - The huge coffin like case is heavier and takes up more room.
2 – It doesn’t fit too well into the Hamilton stand I use for my alto.
Now I have to learn to play in B-flat but overall I think it's great.:D
Glad you are enjoying it and it sound like its going well.

Get something like the contoured Gator GL case (~$80) to lug it around in instead...then it wont be much bigger than an Alto, and it wont weight much at all.

Does the bottom rest on the stand adjust further down? Or else get a second one for your Tenor that fits. Dont go dropping that shiney new horn:)

Could some of the ease of playing compared to the alto be because its a shiney new LEAK FREE horn? It might be worth gettting your alto checked up on?
 

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I borrowed my friend's tenor and really preferred it to alto. I'd agree on many points. It's very easy to play soft and have a wonderful vibrato and subtone. I'm used to it on alto and fine with it, but it's just too much nicer on tenor. Altissimo is easier in the same general way.

Unfortunately he needed it back, so I no longer have a tenor. For now..
 

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I started out on tenor instead of alto. I now play alto, tenor, and bari, and out of those alot seems to be hardest to be really good at, and bari the easiest. to me tenor is a way better choice than alto.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks all for your responses. This YTS 23 seems to be proving its worth.:D
 

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If it's that easy to play, you probably need a more open mouthpiece.:twisted:;)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
hakukani said:
If it's that easy to play, you probably need a more open mouthpiece.:twisted:;)
What do you think I am? A masochist? :banghead:
 

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Just to answer the question:

The tenor is not easier to learn than the alto and the alto is not easier to learn than the tenor. Also the tenor is not really any harder to learn than the alto and neither is the alto any harder to learn than the tenor.
 

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I would not say that tenor is easier than alto, or vice versa. However, I do know that I can leave the tenor in it's case without practicing/playing it longer than I can my alto before the tone and technique goes bye-bye. Maybe it's playing a Mark VI vs. a Mark VII, or maybe I'm just more of a natural tenor player....or maybe it's the reed/mpc setup. Have been wondering about this for a long time.
 

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JL said:
Just to answer the question:

The tenor is not easier to learn than the alto and the alto is not easier to learn than the tenor. Also the tenor is not really any harder to learn than the alto and neither is the alto any harder to learn than the tenor.
Maybe not harder to learn but harder to want to play. :twisted:

All tenor, all the time. All the other saxophones were made to accompany the tenor. There can be no other reason for their existence.

I'll have to find the Bob Mintzer interview where he confesses to not thinking well in Eb. I found that very liberating. That was about the time I sold my Selmer alto and Buescher bari. :D
 

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Dr G said:
All tenor, all the time. All the other saxophones were made to accompany the tenor. There can be no other reason for their existence. :D
Ha Ha, I'm with you on this! I keep telling myself, "you gotta pull out that alto and play it once in awhile." Finally I do it, and after 10 minutes, out comes the tenor, and back goes the alto into its case. But I'll keep tryin'....
 
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