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So I have been studying saxophone for about three years now. I play mostly Alto, with a Vandorem A3 mouthpiece and more recently, a Selmer C* Soloist.

I noticed that my reeds don't last me much: Practicing half an hour per day and having lessons once a week of one hour, a wood reed (vandoren classic 2.5) last me a bit less than 3 weeks and a plastic reed (Legere 2) last me about 2 months. The Legere ones would quickly start bending in the tip, which makes me think I tongue too aggressively.

Does that make sense? If so, how can I get rid of that habit? Even explicitly trying not to do it, I have a hard time keeping my attacks softer. Any other advice on how to make a reed last longer?
 

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12 hours on a reed? That seems pretty good IMO. I am interested in what kind of mileage other people average per reed though.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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If I get 12 sets out of a cane reed I'm going to have it bronzed and put on the mantelpiece. That's about six gigs for me - even my Fibracells on baritone and alto are croaking by then.
I'd suggest the OP is using Legere reeds that are too soft - it has nothing to do with 'attack'. The cane reeds (not 'wood') seem to be lasting normally.
All reeds immediately take a curve because they have to curve to be played. A stronger reed is harder to make curve and takes more air. If you take the reed off the mouthpiece after playing and put it in some kind of reed guard where its held straight, it'll be nice and straight the next time.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Don’t worry about the reed, your tongue attack is only too aggressive if it sounds too aggressive.

It’s a good thing to be very versatile and to be able to tongue aggressively when appropriate and to tongue subtly when appropriate.

It’s the music that matters in the end.
 

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So I have been studying saxophone for about three years now. I play mostly Alto, with a Vandorem A3 mouthpiece and more recently, a Selmer C* Soloist.

I noticed that my reeds don't last me much: Practicing half an hour per day and having lessons once a week of one hour, a wood reed (vandoren classic 2.5) last me a bit less than 3 weeks and a plastic reed (Legere 2) last me about 2 months. The Legere ones would quickly start bending in the tip, which makes me think I tongue too aggressively.

Does that make sense? If so, how can I get rid of that habit? Even explicitly trying not to do it, I have a hard time keeping my attacks softer. Any other advice on how to make a reed last longer?
"bending in the tip"??? No, that doesn't make sense. It implies that you are touching your tongue to the very end of the reed, rather than on the underside, just short of the tip.

Do your "wood" reeds die due to chipping?
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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"bending in the tip"??? No, that doesn't make sense. It implies that you are touching your tongue to the very end of the reed, rather than on the underside, just short of the tip.
I will often touch the tip of the reed, it still shouldn't cause bending or any other damage.
 

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As others have already pointed out, your reeds are not bending or dying due to your attack. Like 1saxman says I can get about 4 to 5 gigs at most, out of a cane reed. That's around 12-15 hours or a bit more. So your reeds are behaving pretty much as expected.
 

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If your reeds are 'bending at the tip', as in conforming to the facing curve, try taking in a bit more mouthpiece.
That type of 'curving' generally means you're playing too close to the tip.
3-4 weeks of playing around an hour/day is close to the 'average life span' of a CANE, not wood, reed. 😉
 

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Be sure your reed doesn't stick out past the mpc.
When pushed flat to the mpc it should come as close as possible to the edge without going past.
Reeds and mpcs seldom match up perfectly so average the position so it's as close as possible overall.
This is what I've been taught and what works for me.
 

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"Getting back to putting the reed on the mouthpiece in the right way--I had mentioned that the larger the facing the farther over the tip of the mouthpiece the reed should be placed to compensate for the shortening of the reed that occurs as the reed follows the curve of the mouthpiece facing. If the reed (when you press it down) covers the entire tip rail, you will observe that the tone becomes clearer and more solid--even a little darker. In turning the mouthpiece around (looking at the top of the mouthpiece), and pressing the reed down with the finger, you should see a miniscule hairline of the reed sticking out. It also tells you if the tip of the mouthpiece has been shaped to fit the contour of the reed properly. However, the tips of the reeds are not all the same, so it really doesn’t matter as long as the reed covers the entire tip rail. If it only covers a tiny amount of the tip rail--result--squeaks, no doubt." Santy Runyon

https://www.saxontheweb.net/Coats/SantyReeds2.html
 
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