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Discussion Starter #1
Tried to search this topic up but couldn’t find an answer.

So, is it worth taking a “bad” Link and paying for it to be made a good one? Or is it better to hunt for a “good one?
Interested in opinions.
Btw, what would it cost to do anyway?
 

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i think it is. i had a Link NY 10* that i bought used and someone had messed it up pretty good. It wouldn't play at all. i sent it to Mojo (Keith Bradbury) and he turned it into a wonderful player. It has been my main piece for several years now. i don't remember the exact cost but i think it was around 90USD. i paid 150USD for the piece so i think it was a reasonable deal for me. i have had work done by Mojo (3 pieces), Ed Zentner (1 piece), and Eric Drake (3 pieces). They have all done very good work at a fair price and in a timely fashion.

Links are good sounding pieces, so if you have one put in good shape you have a nice piece.
 

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I think the best approach would be to try as many as you can, and find the best one. THEN send it to someone who understands Links, perhaps with a recording of how you play on it and an email or phone discussion of what you perceive are the shortcomings.

Another option is to try the "Vintage" Tone Master they are now making - I've seen some very positive reviews, so I bought one and it's very good - not great but very good. The only problem was the shank was too narrow, so I used the sandpaper-on-a-dowel trick to ream it out - took about an hour. This is a known problem with this mouthpiece.

I think most refacers charge around $150 or so (possibly less) to "fix" the problems on a Link. They should certainly flatten the table, if needed, and very likely correct the curve and maybe adjust the baffle a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think the best approach would be to try as many as you can, and find the best one. THEN send it to someone who understands Links, perhaps with a recording of how you play on it and an email or phone discussion of what you perceive are the shortcomings.

Another option is to try the "Vintage" Tone Master they are now making - I've seen some very positive reviews, so I bought one and it's very good - not great but very good. The only problem was the shank was too narrow, so I used the sandpaper-on-a-dowel trick to ream it out - took about an hour. This is a known problem with this mouthpiece.

I think most refacers charge around $150 or so (possibly less) to "fix" the problems on a Link. They should certainly flatten the table, if needed, and very likely correct the curve and maybe adjust the baffle a bit.
I did pick up a STM 6 over the weekend, when play-testing i loved the sound. Was cheap enough that i decided to make the investment. What i am noticing is the reeds (tried several) all seem to sit a bit lopsided from side to side on the curves to the tip. Once a reed is a bit water logged, i do notice that i feel air on the right side hitting my outer lip, which is the same side that the reeds seem to not be lying properly on.

So i am basically thinking a 'flatten the table, adjust the curves" approach would button up the mpc. From the sounds of things above, it seems like it would.
 
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