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Solo and ensemble is coming up very soon, and im playing a gershwin fantasy, which has a lot of altissimo in it.
(The Song): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GvFatfMFs8

I was thinking about putting a double A at one of the peaks of the song for extra style points, but i'm not even sure its achievable without biting the reed or something gimmicky like that.
I can't seem to find any altissimo charts with a double A listed, although some do have the double G Right Below it, like the Barrick Altissimo chart i'm using now.
If anyone knows how to reach this note or has advice on high notes in general please let me know, thanks!
 

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Do you mean A3? If so, its usually 2 &3 on the LH and if its flat, add the G# key.
 

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The usual sax nomenclature calls the low octave "1" , the second oftave "2", and this means that the highest note with standard fingering would be F3.
If you meant A3, that is in your chart.
So I expect you meant A4. The second altissimo A.

I have a hard time getting a nice "musical"
A4 on the tenor. The Conn alto goes up there a lot easier.
And still sounding like music, not just screeching.

Would have to recommend that you only play up high if it sounds GREAT.

Both horns give me the best A4 just using the front high F key and letting it rip.
I would not bust that out solo in an audition, though. I play that kind of stuff for rock or RnB.l where the quality of that one note does not matter so much.

But that is just me. Experiment and see what works.
 

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I think he’s asking about ‘breaking’ the A with another overtone....the best I can offer is to play the altissimo notes often enough in practice that you can start breaking them on purpose. The G is pretty easy to break because it’s less stable than the A. Try different fingerings for a pleasing break. I’ve only started playing with the concept myself recently, but there’s some pretty cool stuff you can do with enough time and effort - neither of which I have in abundance to devote to additional altissimo studies.

Of course you may not be asking about this at all, in which case - ignore this post and carry on....
 

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For A4 I use the same fingering as A3 0XX|XXX with the octave key. But you have to voice it up an octave.

That fingering is very easy for splitting the A3 as well.

I'm never able to hit the G4 or A4 if I'm not using a sufficiently stiff reed.
 

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Solo and ensemble is coming up very soon, and im playing a gershwin fantasy, which has a lot of altissimo in it.
(The Song): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GvFatfMFs8

I was thinking about putting a double A at one of the peaks of the song for extra style points, but i'm not even sure its achievable without biting the reed or something gimmicky like that...
If you don’t already have it in your toolbox, now is a bad time to consider adding it.

The judges will appreciate a musical performance. You won’t impress with a weak gimmick.
 

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If you don’t already have it in your toolbox, now is a bad time to consider adding it.

The judges will appreciate a musical performance. You won’t impress with a weak gimmick.
^ and then there’s this ^

....But a strong gimmick is a show stopper! Work on it for about a year and then hit ‘em between the eyes!
 

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The A above the usual altissimo A (in other words, a semitone lower than four octaves above low Bb) will sound like a horrible squeal unless you are of the caliber of Lenny Pickett, Sigurd Rascher, Hamiett Bluiett, etc. I'm betting that Lenny Pickett you ain't.

Since, after all, this is a written piece, why not just play what's written?
 

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Well, I listened to the whole You Tuba.

Why does this player's schmaltz just grate on my ears, and Johnny Hodges' schmaltz sound wonderful?

Lots of technique on display there but am not impressed by the composition, or the constant never-changing vibrato, or the one and only tone quality.

Listen to these for a counterexample. Note that Hodges' vibrato, dynamic level, tone quality, and articulation vary moment to moment, note to note, and phrase to phrase. Forget about playing notes that make dogs howl. Try to sound like this instead.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wINfnnUlrwY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGZDRQUSMmE&start_radio=1&list=RDhGZDRQUSMmE#t=11
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOePGV9Utrk&index=24&list=RDhGZDRQUSMmE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maM2nb0ieCY&index=26&list=RDhGZDRQUSMmE

I'll even throw in a Gershwin tune for fun:

Sonny Criss: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irHdv2HH2RM
 
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