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Discussion Starter #1
Is it normal to sound the same on any reed, mouthpiece or saxophone?
Since picking the horn back up, I've experimented with different reeds, mouthpieces as well as horns. What I've noticed is that I sound pretty much the same regardless of what I'm playing. Because of this I've just settled on playing what responds the best and feels the most comfortable to play. Reeds, Mouthpiece, Horn - I love the way my C-ball feels. A few days ago I was at my techs and played his Vintage Superdynaction, I did notice a warmer tone which was incredibly full in the palm keys - But I equate that to the quality of this horns Neck (I'll be upgrading to a KB sax neck to replace the stock neck on my C-ball as soon as I can afford it) more so for response and focus.

Never the less, I read all sorts of statements stating that this mouthpiece will do this, or that mouthpiece will be brighter. I've played dark and bright mouthpieces, and I sounded the same! Is that because I have not developed my own personal tone yet? Or is it because I have in fact developed my own personal tone even though its been such a short time back on the horn?
 

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I've just settled on playing what responds the best and feels the most comfortable to play.
That's the way I would go. I agree that it's hard for the player to judge the quality of his own sound without electronic help, for example, listening to your record.

However, I believe that a vague perception of the actual sound quality influences decisively your judgment about a good 'response' and 'comfort', even though it is hard to quantify. When you choose the instrument you feel the best about, you cannot tell whether it has the best sound, but chances are it actually does.
 

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Is it normal to sound the same on any reed, mouthpiece or saxophone?

I'll be upgrading to a KB sax neck to replace the stock neck on my C-ball as soon as I can afford it) more so for response and focus.
If you sound the same on everything, why do you think a $1000+ neck is going to change things for the better?
 

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the sound develops with the player and it is mostly depending from physical causes ( your oral cavity shape, your embouchure) also your brain will choose a sound and adapt you ( your physically adaptable parts) to produce the sound that it has chosen to recognize as “ right" and as "your own", and at some point you will sound approximately the same on everything.

Equipment is a facilitator. Any neck or reed or mouthpiece will seem to you more or less apt to reach what your brain recognizes as its own.
When changing equipment you will experience a short lived “ change” until your brain will command the necessary changes to oral cavity and embouchure to return to “ your sound”.

Listen to Sonny Rollins, he changed at the very least three major horns (and who knows how many other things) Buescher, King Super 20 and Selmer, his sound is basically stayed the same all the time.
 

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I've played dark and bright mouthpieces, and I sounded the same !
OK, let's examine this comment.

So...what is your definition of 'I sound the same' ?

Because, FWIW, I would find it a bit hard to believe that the actual 'tonality' you are producing on your horn would be virtually 'the same' if you are playing a low baffle, fairly classic chamber sorta straight-in-the-pocket rubber Meyer vs. some high-baffle, smaller-chamber mouthpiece. Sonically, I would bet there would be a difference (in focus/width/spread, harmonic overtones, darkness vs. brightness, etc...)

So I am trying to get at what aspect of 'sound' is causing you bewilderment...
 

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Your brain will choose a sound and adapt you ( your physically adaptable parts) to produce the sound that it has chosen to recognize as “ right" and as "your own", and at some point you will sound approximately the same on everything.
That is good news indeed for every player, and his wallet, if only it were true. If you can adapt to playing a $1500 horn and sound the same as with any other, why do people go to such lengths to own and play some $10,000 silver-plated good-serial-number Mark VI? Moreover, modern saxophone makers in France, Japan and Germany will disagree, and I would not blame them: why sweat for decades to create your recognizable brand if a player can make your horn sound just as any other one?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I didn't mean to open up a can of worms.
I can notice minor changes, however my sound fundamentally seems the same. I was just hoping people with more experience could chime in.

I want to replace the neck on my horn so I get better intonation, a thicker/fuller pam key range, better response and a more focused sound. I can hear both focused and spread depending on what equipment I'm on, the underlying sound/tone doesn't change though.
i guess I was under the impression that different equipment would totally change your sound, so I asked some questions! The underlying tone is always the same, however you will hear more high frequencies, or low frequencies, more mellow vs more aggressive. I wasn't sure if this was typical of anybody else, or just what I'm experiencing due to my lack of time on the horn.

I may have been a little over zealous when I said I sound the exact same on anything - In my mind I focus on the part that sounds like me, thus my mind tells me nothing has changed. If I could focus on the pieces that do sound different, I may notice them more.

I'm sorry guys.
 

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I didn't mean to open up a can of worms.
I can notice minor changes, however my sound fundamentally seems the same. I was just hoping people with more experience could chime in.

I want to replace the neck on my horn so I get better intonation, a thicker/fuller pam key range, better response and a more focused sound. I can hear both focused and spread depending on what equipment I'm on, the underlying sound/tone doesn't change though.
i guess I was under the impression that different equipment would totally change your sound, so I asked some questions! The underlying tone is always the same, however you will hear more high frequencies, or low frequencies, more mellow vs more aggressive. I wasn't sure if this was typical of anybody else, or just what I'm experiencing due to my lack of time on the horn.

I may have been a little over zealous when I said I sound the exact same on anything - In my mind I focus on the part that sounds like me, thus my mind tells me nothing has changed. If I could focus on the pieces that do sound different, I may notice them more.

I'm sorry guys.
In order to drastically change your sound you have to change the way you play.

A lot of people (myself included) are pretty set in their ways for good and for bad and have found what works for them. But to get a drastic change in sound you'd need to actually change how you blow air through the horn, where you play the mouthpiece, how much air you use, phrasing, articulation, isms and using a different set up to accentuate certain parts of how you play can help a lot.
 
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