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I'm not a flipper, but I'm one of these typical SOTW guys who likes to buy and try and hang onto the exceptional ones. I've noticed that I get a very satisfying feeling both when I buy and when I sell a horn. I'm curious, which do you think is more fun and why?
 

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Selling is a hassle...time, effort, and shipping horns is a pain. At least when buying you get a potential new toy!

Money is nice but it comes and goes. There is not much memorable about it.
 

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the nice bit is doing both.

This way I have had over 300 horns pass through my hands and I have learned lots. I would have never bought all those horns for myself alone.
 

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I like selling more. It makes things easier, you have to check less material afterwards and you can start to work with what you have. It feels more pleasant to me when I achieve a goal by developing myself rather than getting there with the help of money that I spent.
On the other hand there seems to be no other way to get there than checking a lot of gear ... I've enjoyed that too as a learning process but meanwhile it feels more like hard work to me: Adapting yourself to something new, checking it for a couple of months to find out if it fits your needs quite often led me to the decision that I'd rather stay with what I already had. When I sell stuff it helps me to confirm myself not to change the winning team. So I still play my Conn 6m for example and will never change/replace it if I don't have to.
 

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The selling part is nice when your not so attached and the buyer is happy.
The buying part can often be a bit (Nice because it’s different) followed by the grass was actually greener beforehand.
I often buy so as to try.
By that I mean, I have no other way to try various horns apart from buying them.
If you’re cautious when buying you can recoup your expenses.
Or you can take a hit.
But at least you learn something along the way.
When you find that keeper it’s a different level.
 

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Actually, with many toys that cost time and money to get the best from, things like saxes, cars, boats, spouses, etc there are always two days that are the happiest; the day you buy and the day you sell. In the middle it’s rather like riding a fading sine wave of enthusiasm...
 

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That is true and as i think about it both are stressful. I dont buy them...i dont sell them. I have a horn i like so Im good.
...of course that doesnt keep me from window shopping
 

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Maybe it's like how it's the best day of your life when you buy a boat, and the best day of your life when you sell it.
 

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I have sold a few saxes through Ebay auctions. There is nothing more exiting than watching the last 30 seconds when 2 or more buyers are trying to outbid one another and driving the price higher and higher. It is like watching a horse race and you have bet on the horse that is ahead. :)
 

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I think I would rather buy...
I've only sold one item on Ebay and that was a '68 Fender Telecaster (which, of course I now regret). I set a $4,000 minimum and some guy bid it up to see what the reserve was..then he cancelled. At that point, so it seems, all of the interest was over. I finally sold it to a previous bidder on a "second chance" for $3,200.00 which was less than I wanted for a 95% 1 owner Telecaster.
So, yeah...I'd rather buy!
 

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Well, for the sake of other readers of this thread, I am going to mention something which, oddly, has not been touched upon yet:

disputes, returns, etc.

Makes selling much more stressful. The fact is, most folks who sell horns are individuals, and most individuals are not techs. And most will not take their horn for a check-up before selling if THEY feel it is playing OK.

So this can open a can of worms, particularly given buyer protection policies of Paypal and eBay and the like. In any given horn transaction, a buyer can pretty easily find something which they can defensibly claim was 'not as described'; even if the horn sent was, in the seller's eyes, in solid shape all around and had no real 'issues'.
So, something to consider.

For me, it's very satisfying to refurb a horn and put it back into circulation, where it should be...particularly because vintage horns were made so damn well and so damn good, and kick the butt of 90% of what is being made today. It's also a nice feeling when I receive the email from buyer saying he/she is happy.

But selling has pitfalls.....
 

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I often buy so as to try.
By that I mean, I have no other way to try various horns apart from buying them.
If you’re cautious when buying you can recoup your expenses.
Or you can take a hit.
But at least you learn something along the way.
Yes, the internet has been good for that. And quite honestly....I feel if you buy something which you are curious about, get it, play it for a bit....and decide not to keep it; you do not necessarily have to sell it and recoup all expenses. It's not a 'fail' if you lose a little $ in the end.

If you lose $100-200 or so on the resale, I would argue wasn't that $ worth the opportunity to try out this model for a spell, one which you had been curious about owning ?

People can spend that $ on far more foolish things. And do.
 

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Well, for the sake of other readers of this thread, I am going to mention something which, oddly, has not been touched upon yet:

disputes, returns, etc.

Makes selling much more stressful. The fact is, most folks who sell horns are individuals, and most individuals are not techs. And most will not take their horn for a check-up before selling if THEY feel it is playing OK.

So this can open a can of worms, particularly given buyer protection policies of Paypal and eBay and the like. In any given horn transaction, a buyer can pretty easily find something which they can defensibly claim was 'not as described'; even if the horn sent was, in the seller's eyes, in solid shape all around and had no real 'issues'.
So, something to consider.

For me, it's very satisfying to refurb a horn and put it back into circulation, where it should be...particularly because vintage horns were made some damn well and sound so damn good, and kick the butt of 90% of what is being made today. It's also a nice feeling when I receive the email from buyer saying he/she is happy.

But selling has pitfalls.....
+1

And ergonomics are overrated.... No not really but they are not half as important as some people make it sound. It's like having a vintage guitar, the chords are different but the sound is better! :evil:

Well, I am off to the mountains and off the grid, have a wonderful weekend everybody!
 

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My last sell and buy was a beat up poorly re-lacquered Mark VI tenor with a mismatched neck for a gently re-lacquered 1938 BA.
I’m happy and have probably quit buying horns. Now mouthpieces, different story.
 

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+1

And ergonomics are overrated.... No not really but they are not half as important as some people make it sound. It's like having a vintage guitar, the chords are different but the sound is better! :evil:

Well, I am off to the mountains and off the grid, have a wonderful weekend everybody!
I highly recommend 'off grid' ! My (ex)GF used to say:

"you must be the only Luddite with their own website !"
 

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No contest: buying. It's not even close. I'm usually a bit melancholy about selling. I'm glad to get the money and all that, but I often feel kind of nostalgic ("remember how exciting it was to get this horn?") and also a little worried I'll wind up wishing I still had it. Buying is always a little worrisome, because what if something goes wrong? But once the horn is in hand, it's so much fun to explore what it can do.
 

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Neither. I like playing them.

Buying is a 'pig in a poke' because you can't walk into a local music store and try them out first. At least around here.

Selling them is a PITA because to sell them it has to be done on-line as there aren't many sax players around here.

If it turns out great buying is better, if not returning and everything associated with it is worse.

But playing them is a joy that cannot be experienced any other way.

Insights and incites by Notes
 
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