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I’m currently playing a size 7 (.070) size mouthpiece on soprano. I have never played soprano before a few months ago, except for a single play-test in college. I’m going to try a size 6 (.065) because sometimes I think the 7 is a little too open for me. I play a .095 on tenor and 0.75 on alto, although I’m mainly a tenor player. Or maybe just try a softer reed? I’m using a 2.5 Rigotti right now.
 

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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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It is a little bigger than most people use, but that (0.070) is the size I prefer. I use a 0.105 on tenor and a 0.080 on alto.

On my main soprano piece (a Gerber Solo LC 7), I typically use either a Rigotti 3L or a Jazz Select 3S.
 

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On Soprano recently moved on from an Otto Link rubber 9 to a 8 metal Bari piece which is .75.
Play a 7*** = .109 Double Ring on tenor an 8 = .85 NY Meyer on Alto, .130 1940s rubber Berg on Bari, and a rubber Selmer F on sopranino.

What ever floats your boat, if you can control it and have good tone go for it.
 

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Sop really needs to be treated as its own instrument - and some sops blow so differently than others to the point that your favorite mouthpiece on one may not work so well on another.

That aside, my tenor tip openings have ranged from .105 to .120 over the last few decades, but .070 has been my happy spot for sop. It was a Lamberson Fmaj7 for a long time with either Yanagisawa or Selmer sops, then I shifted to a Phil-Tone Sapphire to better complement my Borgani Jubilee.

As Tonehole comments, control matters. If you pitch is wild, or you cannot play the full range with solid tone, then a smaller tip may be in order.

Enjoy the Path,
George
 

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I also find that .070 is what suits me ... but I have some .055 to .065 pieces that play great with a harder reed. Some brands/models have a longer or shorter facing length. I recently tried a long facing .070 and I had to go up to a harder reed. And as Dr G said some sops blow differently. The best mouthpiece for my sop might not work well with yours.
 

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Soprano is a whole bunch of specific challenges. You really cannot just transfer any embouchure related parameter straight from a bigger horn. Not from the clarinet either.
I’m also in the process of “relearning” it, and exploring around exactly the same question.
Currently quite comfortable with a Vandoren S25, slightly smaller tip than a typical 7. But I’ve also got a RR Shorty H (modern Soloist copy), close to 7, which is very nice to play. No firm decision so far.
What you gain in tonal and pitch flexibility with bigger tips costs quite a bit in intonation challenges. Typically, the Selmer S-III tends to pitch high in the upper left hand, a bigger tip makes it worse.
As a side note, I also ordered a Yamaha 7C (= 5*), a very good cheap workhorse to learn and get used to a new horn. I’m mainly using it to play Mozart. To mistreat Mozart….
 
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Some good advice on this above also classical players use smaller openings i currently use the SL5 Vandoren its around 49 thou its flexible and very controlable i think Grover Washington played a Runyon around a 70 my very favourite Soprano player .
 

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I should have added. One typical reason to play big tips on bigger horns is just to get more volume without fighting against your mouthpiece. Soprano sounds loud and high by default, you really don't need to play big tips.
I got a Selmer S90-200 (= 4* or a C*) with my S-III, this thing shouts like hell if needed, and plays nice in tune. Actually a perfect match. I just have trouble with it, as I close it with my jazzy embouchure. Should I seriously pursue a more orchestral or 4tet repertoire, this would be the right mouthpiece.
 
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I should have added. One typical reason to play big tips on bigger horns is just to get more volume without fighting against your mouthpiece. Soprano sounds loud and high by default, you really don't need to play big tips.
I got a Selmer S90-200 (= 4* or a C*) with my S-III, this thing shouts like hell if needed, and plays nice in tune. Actually a perfect match. I just have trouble with it, as I close it with my jazzy embouchure. Should I seriously pursue a more orchestral or 4tet repertoire, this would be the right mouthpiece.
I like the S90 and Optimums on Soprano my S80 sounds a little too brash in comparison on my SA80 series 2.
 

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I play .056 (as far as I can tell by measuring) on soprano, whereas I play .075 on alto and .100 on tenor. If that's of any help at all. Looks like you play similar tips to me on tenor and alto, so I wouldn't be surprised if you find .070 a little open on soprano, but who knows. If that's what you're feeling, then trying a smaller tip is a good idea if you can, even if only confirms that the .070 is right for you.
 

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Really depends on the piece. And what kind of music you’re playing. .042 can be perfect for a Selmer classic, while who knows how wide a good playing RPC can get.
 

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The opening is relative...
the mouthpiece must be efficient with a decent curve, otherwise you cannot judge whether a mouthpiece is good or not
This ^
Tip opening interacts with facing curve, interacts with rail and tip width and symmetry, interacts with baffle size and shape, interacts with reed type, interacts with embouchure, experience, practice and etc.
 
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