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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I trust MOST of you guys to give me an honest answer to this question.

I've always wanted to get a degree in Instrumental Ed. But being a wife and stay at home Mom I've put my dreams on hold for more important things....Hubbys' job, raising my girls, buying a family farm.
Now Hubby has a job that will keep him away from home for weeks at a time. My girls are 20, 16, and 14. They don't need a Mommy quite as much anymore.

So what do you think?
Is Bandmommy too old to go for it? Or should I be happy just doing the private lesson thing with the Middle Schoolers? :?
 

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Bandmommy,

I don't know you. I only know that your posts are invariably intelligent, witty and come from a real affection for the kids you teach. I'd bet the house on you getting distinctions in every subject.

GO FOR IT!
 

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Not too old at at all. I'm 28 and when I was in school, they're were tons of other students in their 40's,50's and even 60's. If you love teaching and want to do that now that your role as a parent isn't as time consuming, go for it!

-Dan
 

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Forum Contributor 2010, Distinguished SOTW Member
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bandmommy said:
I trust MOST of you guys to give me an honest answer to this question.

I've always wanted to get a degree in Instrumental Ed. But being a wife and stay at home Mom I've put my dreams on hold for more important things....Hubbys' job, raising my girls, buying a family farm.
Now Hubby has a job that will keep him away from home for weeks at a time. My girls are 20, 16, and 14. They don't need a Mommy quite as much anymore.

So what do you think?
Is Bandmommy too old to go for it? Or should I be happy just doing the private lesson thing with the Middle Schoolers? :?
Bandmommy:

I am a university person, and have been for nearly 30 years (longer if you count all that time in grad school). I currently work at an enormous state school, but I have been an academic migrant worker, so to speak, and have worked for colleges and universites all over the country, large and small. I can tell you for sure that many others are doing exactly what you say you want to -- I don't speak of the specific degree (I teach writing) but of the "late" return. If it is something you want to do, you should not hesitate for a moment. And: depending on the kind of school you go to, you will find plenty of others who are in your general situation, so you won't feel isolated among the 18-year-olds (not that you couldn't deal with 'em!). Big schools now tend to have extremely diverse student populations -- with reference to ethnicity, gender, class, and age. We recently graduated someone in her 80s who had returned to finish a degree after 60+ years! I never met her, but by all reports she is a highly intelligent, lively person who had a wonderful experience getting the degree. As a teacher -- especially when I am (as I continually do) teach creative writing to undergrads -- I am delighted to have older students: people who actually know something about life! People who have children and understand the nature of that experience! Etc. They enrich the classroom discourse immeasurably. 18, 19, 20 year olds: no matter how intelligent and well prepared they may be (and that is assuming a lot, let me tell you!) are nevertheless resolutely ignorant about certain dimensions of experience. But you have 3 of these wonderful creatures, and I don't have to tell you these things!

If you have the luxury, shop around a bit and find a university or college that you like. Or, if there's just one school in the neighborhood and that's the only choice, fine: but do it. If you don't take the shot, you will always regret it. And if you go ahead, I can almost guarantee that you will have a splendid experience. And beyond that: professional opportunities!

Let us know what you decide, and how it goes.
 

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We don't (usually) judge performers by what formal qualifications they have, or by what institution they attended, but if you want a teaching job that piece of paper is very important.

Why not?
 

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You will be happy to know that there are TWO people in my music theory class over the age of 40, they are both music majors trying to get a degree in either therapy or education. So no, it is NOT to late! Go for it!
 

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Bandmommy,
I'm disappointed you have to ask such a question:cry: . In this day and age no one is ever too old to learn new things and people who return to university (as a student) after years of experience outside get a lot more respect all around than they used to do.
Go for it. It's probably the best thing you'll ever do and I'm sure your family will respect you more for it.
(BTW I'm thinking of doing the same thing in a few years. Musical therapy sounds interesting and I come from a completely unrelated field. BTW I'm 50 though many people say I look younger. Your husband may start bragging around that he's sleeping with a student.:D )
 

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Counterpoint-
What! You're crazy! Teaching one-on-one is beautiful compared to large group baby-sitting with noise makers. In some communities, you can substitute without teaching credentials. If that is possible where you live, try subbing in a music class. If this experience fosters a continued longing to teach music in a school setting, then fantastic.

Counter-Counter-Point ;-)
Go for it! Teaching music and inspiring today's youth to reach beyond what is passed off as music today is an awesome experience. In my elementary music classes, my students are learning about a different composer each week. The first question each week is, "Who's that?"
"It's not George Washington!" I reply.
 

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46, geez you're just a babe! I didn't even start teaching public school until I was almost your age.

Now, get to work!
 

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You are kidding, right? Too old? If you have the time and desire what does your age have to do with the decision? I'm retired from career 1 ( lawyering), in my early 60's, and blowing my tail off in a blues band with youngsters my kids' ages. You have time to start at least two more careers. ( and you can bet the farm on that).
 

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Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
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I'm going to add a little balance against all the "go for it!!" merchants (hi, guys!! ). The question is not "are you too old?" but rather "do you really want to do this?"

I would advise doing lots of observations of the kind of classes you might end up teaching in the kind of school you'd be teaching in. Further, I'd be very careful in my choice of training institution. Really check that out, because the way you are trained to teach will have a big effect on how you end up teaching. You may also find that going back to school to train is quite a difficult experience when you're more "mature" (;) ). You appear to me to be a strong-minded individualist and working within institutions may require you to make some adjustments.

The other side is financial, of course. If you are paying to retrain then that will be an added pressure. Also, you need to balance your current lifestyle and private teaching and other commitments against what you would be getting in exchange. Working within a school can be draining and all-consuming for some people. Others find it a complete joy, of course.

I'm saying all this not to discourage you but rather because I think if you go into this kind of thing with your eyes open it works out better in the long run. Now, that was possibly the most serious post I have ever made to SOTW. Phew! :)

All the best to you, bandmommy!
 

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question is : why do you want to do that?

Personal development? : go for it.
filling up your time with something you like? : go for it.
as an obligation because you want to find a job with it? : think about it again : which job you want and why do you want it?
And if you figured that out, question is if you really need that paper or if you have other qualifications that could get you the job too.

my 2 cents.
 

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I have a friend who went back to school - law school - at the age of 47, after the kids were grown and life was financially stable. She's practicing law. She's now 57. I went back to law school, where I met my friend, at 32. I'm now 43. I just picked up the sax a year ago.

Too old? NO! It is a matter, as Rooty says above, of whether you really want to do it. And only you can make that decision based on your reasons, your life, and whether you can afford to do it (either paying or creating student loan debt for yourself and thus for your family).

Certainly, as was pointed out above, if you want to teach in a more formal setting, you'd probably need the degree.

Good luck with it!
 

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Didn't some 90 year old lady just get an MBA?

You are about half her age...
 

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RootyTootoot said:
I'm going to add a little balance against all the "go for it!!" merchants (hi, guys!! ).
Gopher merchants!? I applaud your concern for your fellow rodents, Hamster, but aren't you getting a little paranoid? Too much time spent going 'round and 'round in that little spinning cage, hmmmmmm?:shock: :D

Speaking of: Bandmommy, doing an academic degree (especially one in the field of education!) can sometimes seem like a journey in Rooty's special exercise unit: 'round and 'round you go, jumping through this hoop and that hoop. The hamster is right that you need to know you want to do it. My assumption was that you did want to, or you wouldn't have asked the question!:D Which was not: guys, what do I want, but: guys, can I do this?

You can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for the words of encouragement!

I'll bet none of you thought that ballsy Bandmommy could be the least bit unsure of herself. Well,,,I am. :shock:

Being a suppportive wife and mother have taken priority over any personal aspirations. I have a major problem with putting their needs first. Don't get me wrong,, I do a few things just for me. Just not to this extent. I feel like I'm being selfish, and selfishness is WRONG.

This is a MAJOR life changing decision. Not to mention financial challenge. There are a couple of Universities with excellent music programs within commuting distance. Thankfully I took the PSAT, SAT, and ACT tests. I hope I scored high enough to meet the minimum requirements for admission.

If by some miracle I get accepted, find enough grant and scholorship money, and actually DO this,,,,,,,

Who want's to help me with my homework!?!?:D
 

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bandmommy said:
1. Being a suppportive wife and mother have taken priority over any personal aspirations. I have a major problem with putting their needs first. Don't get me wrong,, I do a few things just for me. Just not to this extent. I feel like I'm being selfish, and selfishness is WRONG.

2.Who want's to help me with my homework!?!?:D
1. "Go for it" is correct in relation to that worry. :)

2. Get Carbs to check your spelling. You could be "study buddies"!! :twisted: ;)

Good luck with it all.

Reedspinter: Leave my cage out of this. I just had it cleaned, you gopher bully.

Seriously, to address Reed's last post: There is a difference between "wanting it" (in a vague, aspirational sense) and "wanting it" when you know exactly what "it" is. Or, to put it another way, to know "can I do this?" you must first identify "this". I'm just trying to make sure that bandmommy wants this big change in her life in the second sense of "wanting it".
I must admit to a little bit of self-interest here. I returned to study in my early 30s to get a teaching diploma and must admit that I found my studies much less enjoyable and helpful than I had hoped. In truth, I didn't think my decision through as well as I could have done and didn't do my research. The fact is that "doing a course" is not good in itself. Hence my caution, which is in no way intended to be a "put down" to bandmommy's aspirations. Quite the opposite, in fact. :)
 
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