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Discussion Starter #1
I'm slightly confused on this app. I've mostly figured out chord charts and what most symbols mean. I just want to clarify one thing and I'll post a screen shot.

Who know if this means I'm just supposed to play notes from the chords listed here or is the app showing me in the key of concert?

It lets me pick the key but I'm assuming its in concert.... So this jam is in concert Bb and I need to convert for tenor sax?

My music theory and all that jazz is pretty uneducated at this point

Hopefully this question makes some sense

Thanks
 

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Yes from what I remember that circled is the key (in concert) the song is in. However, there is an option where you can transpose for tenor (Bb) where from that point on everything you'll see in the circled will be transposed to your key... so if it showed Bb it would really be concert Ab (your Bb). Make sense?
 

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As I understand it, the key shown in the lower picture indicates what the tune is in concert - Bb in this case.

The upper photo shows the root chord as Bb as well. If you go into settings/transposing instrument, I believe that you'll find that C is checked.

If you check Bb, then you'll see the chords shift up a step - Bb will become C. Which makes sense, because when you play C on a tenor, the pitch you get is concert Bb.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
All of you are 100% right

Thanks!

I should have dug a little deeper. Appreciate ya though
 

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I'd actually recommend not doing that, unless you are going to be faced with a lot of transposed written music, or transposed chord progressions. In the "real world", everyone uses the un-transposed charts. Learn to transpose :)

If you are going to be playing a lot of big-band charts, then it might be worthwhile to play on the transposed parts. But for playing tunes, like in a jam session for example, just learn to transpose.
 

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I'd actually recommend not doing that, unless you are going to be faced with a lot of transposed written music, or transposed chord progressions. In the "real world", everyone uses the un-transposed charts. Learn to transpose :)

If you are going to be playing a lot of big-band charts, then it might be worthwhile to play on the transposed parts. But for playing tunes, like in a jam session for example, just learn to transpose.
It seems to me that there's something to this.

I'm actually a little sorry that as a result of reading this thread, I've learned how to do this. Up until now, I've just been making myself adjust to playing while looking at C concert music. I think I'll probably just continue to do it the way I have been already! It gets easier over time . . .
 
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