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Discussion Starter #1
This is not really "C" content, but I feel like the "C" folks are an open-minded bunch who can appreciate experimentation, so I'll ask the question here, if nobody minds.

I am making a small, portable musical instrument out of a clarinet mouthpiece and a straight length of copper pipe. I have noticed a peculiar phenomenon, and I wonder if anyone can offer explanations or relevant observations.

When I play with the horn pointing down nearly vertical, the pitch of all notes is about 1/4 tone lower than if I play with the horn pointing away from me at almost horizontal.

I'm not sure of the cause. The tone is brighter in the horizontal position.

I'm trying to figure out which is the "true" pitch and which the abberation. This is important, because I'm still trying to refine the size and placement of the toneholes, and I'm no longer sure which horn position to tune to.

Any insights or suggestions would be much appreciated.

 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Yes, it's more of a clarinet. There is no reason that there should be any difference, can you post some soundclips of this phenomenom?

BTW, looks like a really nice idea, you could market these once you get the tuning sorted.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Acoustically, it's more of a clarinet: straight bore, overblows the 12th. But if you hold it out in front of you, the sound gets a lot saxier.
 

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I figure it to be a result of the clarinet mouthpiece interaction with your embouchure. The mouthpieces are designed, by and large (VD profile 88 pieces being a notable exception), to be played with the instrument pointed down. When you insert it into your mouth pointed straight out you wind up with the lower lip in a very different position on the reed assuming your top teeth are at the same place.

This could easily snarl up the intonation.

I get the same effect with one of my Zaphoons modified to take a clarinet mouthpiece.

All pure speculation as to cause on my part, of course.
 

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The key to this puzzle contained in the answers to these questions. What is the angle of the mouthpiece in relation to your mouth in each instance? A related question is where do you place your top teeth when you play each different way?

I can help you do the math to find the natural resonant frequency of the instrument if you will give the length of the tube. The I.D. of the pipe is needed as well to figure the end correction. This is a clever idea. When you get it finished you can buff it and relacquer it and take away 1/2 its resale value. :)

John
 

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For some reason I am unable to get a note from a flute & have often thought of attaching a soprano mouthpiece....next project perhaps jbt, or has it been done?
 

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Nice touch, by the by, on the double hole concept for the low end (on the MM (Metaphorce Miracle) horn) . The weak point of my virtually-identical-but-for-material zaphoon- operator aside- has always been the low C# (I designated the all closed low note as C) and low Eb. Half holing them without producing a weak, obviously undervented, note has always been a trial.

How's the overblown second octave G through C? I had to tinker with the last cm of bore quite a bit to bring the G into tune (ran way sharp- LH 1 cracked all others closed- a slight choke with a slight extension worked for me).
 

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For some reason I am unable to get a note from a flute & have often thought of attaching a soprano mouthpiece....next project perhaps jbt, or has it been done?
At the risk of going off-topic (well, that's a first [rolleyes] ) there was a 'whistle-head for a flute called the 'Eklute', now defunct, but how about this ?

http://www.tinwhistles.us/jubilee/pagesmith/26

Eddie Harris used to stick various woodwind mouthpieces on brass instruments, and vice versa.

-- Back on topic -- metaphorce, I (too) reckon the pitch change has to do with embouchure change when you go from near-vertical to horizontal. The change in embouchure could account for the sound change as well... Unless you're moving so quickly it's the 'Doppler' effect :bluewink:
 

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At the risk of going off-topic (well, that's a first [rolleyes] ) there was a 'whistle-head for a flute called the 'Eklute', now defunct, but how about this ?

http://www.tinwhistles.us/jubilee/pagesmith/26

Eddie Harris used to stick various woodwind mouthpieces on brass instruments, and vice versa.

-- Back on topic -- metaphorce, I (too) reckon the pitch change has to do with embouchure change when you go from near-vertical to horizontal. The change in embouchure could account for the sound change as well... Unless you're moving so quickly it's the 'Doppler' effect :bluewink:
Thank you, I simply knew that you would know;where do you find all this stuff?
Only snag with that solution is that I would have to join a Folkie band. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
For some reason I am unable to get a note from a flute & have often thought of attaching a soprano mouthpiece....next project perhaps jbt, or has it been done?
sax pieces don't behave well on the cylindrical tubes I've tried. That's why I'm stuck with a claribet Mp.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This horn is diferent from the Hot Fountain Pen/Xaphoon in terms of a couple of tonehole placements. My thumb is the highest note and has a separate register hole. I placed the drilled halfholes on fingers where I have trouble I have trouble landing a halfhole on the descent.

I'm still not getting a decent 2nd octave C# (or concert B; my low note in he C position is Bb, but the tube is not a pure Bb tuning.) by cross fingering. I think this means the hole needs to be smaller. Pity, because the bigger they are, the better they sound, but the less susceptible to crossfingering. And there is one note that cannot be had, the 2nd F# (aka concert E) doesn't exist, and may make life challenging when playing with blues guitarists.

This is tube #19, and the 7th or 8th made of copper. (early versions were pvc; much easier to drill accurately, can be finetuned with a pocketknife, but harder to drill halfholes without breakage.). I suspect #21 will be right on the money.
 
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