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My alto and soprano saxes are artist level silver Jupiters. For the soprano, I am using the stock mouthpiece that came with the instrument, and I am using a student conn mouthpiece that came with my first Alto. I only use the Jupiter stock mouthpiece on the alto when I want to do things in the altissimo register. I play on a size 3.5 Java alto reed and a 3 rico soprano reed. I tried to play on a size 3 traditional vandoren soprano reed but It was way to hard for me. Also, I am getting a zhenghao mouthpieces for both my alto and soprano. (I don't think that was a really good decision). Recently I have had some intonation problems and I have tried to buzz into my mouthpiece but my pitch fluctuates continuously. How do I get better control of my pitch so I can improve my overall intonation?:?
 

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I had a similar problem a while ago, and my teacher suggested this practice technique which worked surprisingly well for me. You'll need to get yourself a chromatic tuner. Also, if you've got access to a piano, it really helps, but you can just skip the piano steps if you have to. I'm not sure if this will work for a soprano... but it worked for me on alto.



Setup: Push your mouthpiece on really far on the neck, further than you usually do. This will make your overall tuning sharp (since you're making the instrument smaller).

Step1: Play an A on the piano (equivalent to an F# on an alto sax).

Step2: Sing the note you played white dropping your jaw as far as you can, bringing the corners of your mouth closer together, and making an AW sound. This will get your throat in the correct position, and it will prepare your mouth for a good embouchure.

Step3: Close your eyes and play the note (F# in this case) and try to match what you just heard from the piano and what you just hummed. Since you're mouthpiece is on really far, you will naturally be much too sharp. The key now is to drop your jaw and relax. Relaxing your throat is the most important, but you need to relax all of your muscles as well. This will 'push' the note down in tune.

Step4: When you think you've matched it, look at the tuner and try to adjust it so it is in tune with your tuner.

Step5: Repeat Step1-4 with a different note. What worked best for me was to go chromatically downwards for at least an octave. If you each one of your notes is sharp and you cannot drop your jaw/relax anymore, that means your mouthpiece is too far on, so pull out a little.

*NOTE*: The E on the alto sax is a very hard note to get into tune, especially if you are a male player. Something to do with the way your throat is built... I'm not quite sure. If the E is slightly sharp, don't worry about it so much right now, once you get good control on the other notes, it will come eventually.



I hope this helps, it really did help me with my intonation, tuning and my tone.
 
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