Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I play on the schools 50 somethin'-year-old bari and it is just awful. It is a fun horn with a great tone it's just stuffy sometimes and half my notes are over 30 cents sharp or flat. Is this problem me? (I can play my tenor and alto almost perfectly in tune) or is it just the horn? I plan on sending the horn to the shop over vacation anyway. I am really not the best pitch bender yet but I really don't think my lips should have to jump around that much. Again, Is this me or is t the horn?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
go to the overhaul with some very advanced friend, there are some adjustments that can be made if the horn has some major intonation quirks... without sacrificing the horns tone... but you need to go to a goos one for that, like musicmedic...
 

·
Über Geek, Forum Contributor 2010 Distinguished SO
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
First, get the horn looked at. Maybe it doesn't need a total overhaul (I hope the school isn't expecting you to pay for that out of pocket!), but if you're having trouble playing an older bari--especially a school-owned horn--you can expect it to have some problems.

I'd also be interested in knowing what you're using for a setup. Also, are you reasonably sure you're using the original neck? They seem to get switched around on school horns, and if you're using a neck that wasn't designed for the sax you might get some crankiness from it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Well I have not yet made the purchase of a new mpc and I am currently using the school's yamaha 5c and a rovner versa ligature that I purchased. I would normally prefer a metal ligature though. one of the best ligatures I've owned was a bonade inverted but they don't make that for bari. I play mostly in larger wind ensembles so I'm not to comfortable with the large opening/thin reed thing. the horn is a MkVI Bb by the way.
 

·
Über Geek, Forum Contributor 2010 Distinguished SO
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
The ligature is NOT causing the intonation problems you describe, nor is that mouthpiece. I'd suggest having a look at the neck to make sure someone didn't switch it out for one that doesn't match the horn. Not all Mark VI horns had numbers on the neck AND body, by the way, but even if yours isn't numbered you might be able to eyeball it and figure out whether or not it's the one the horn came with.

By the way, if you're mostly playing baritone in a wind ensemble, you might just want to stick with the setup you have. It should help you blend well without being problematic to control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I'm almost positive that the neck is the one that came with the instrument. I planned on staying with the same mpc I'm going to purchase my own 'cause the facing is a little messed up.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
781 Posts
Another possibility is that the neck could be bent slightly downward from years of putting the instrument together. If it is, you should be able to see vertical crease marks along each side. This can wreak havoc on the intonation of any horn.

Randy
www.randyhunterjazz.com
Online Jazz Lessons and Books
New Lesson:
Making Sense of Jazz Improvisation
Lesson Series:
Introduction to the Blues
The Arpeggio Circle
Through the Keys
and more...
Lessons page: www.beginningsax.com/Jazz Improv Lessons.htm
Rhythm Changes Demo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrT0Xw_y9d0
Rhythm Changes Lesson:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMOW7QAfpwo
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,336 Posts
"Half my notes are over 30 cents sharp or flat" is too vague a comment to begin to diagnose what might be the cause.

What note do you tune to? When the mouthpiece is set on the cork to tune that pitch with the tuner, how does the same note an octave higher or lower compare. Check what pitch you are producing on your mouthpiece when you play the mouthpiece alone. It should be no higher than a concert D.

Here are some suggestions to try
- Adjust your embouchure pressure to produce a D concert on the mouthpiece while playing mf - f
- With that same volume and embouchure, tune the bari to A concert by playing a written low F#
- Check the tuning of the F# an octave higher with and without the octave key
- Adjust the embouchure and/or mouthpiece placement slightly if necessary to get both in tune.
- Then finger low B and overblow to the 2nd overtone high F# (without the octave key)
- When these 3 F#'s match you have successfully tuned the instrument (and yourself)

When this has been accomplished, do the following
- Play a 2 octave scale beginning on low C one note at a time at mezzo forte.
- Work to keep the basically the same embouchure throughout, blowing faster air as you go higher.
- Have someone besides yourself watch the tuner and write down the cents each note is flat or sharp.
- Once you have charted your pitch tendencies doing this more than once, post again about what you found out.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top