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Hey guys, I just got a new yts-875ex. However when I test this horn, I found that the E and F with octave key are sharp for 20+ cents, and D is a little stuffy. The others are fine. I have a Selmer seles axos alto as my daily horn. Never had tried a Yamaha tenor before. Just wanna know if it is normal on a 875ex tenor? Appreciate any reply馃檹
 

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Have you checked the actions and made sure everything is sealing correctly? I have tried a couple different 875EX's and all have been great!
 

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I vaguely remember some of the original EX horns had trouble with the original G1 neck, but apparently the issue was resolved fairly quickly. I'm not sure if the problem was alto, tenor, or both. I don't think there is/was an issue with the newer revisions (EXII, EXIII) Is your tenor "new" or "new to you"?
 

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It is normal for those notes to be sharp on many saxophones. Especially 'E'.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I vaguely remember some of the original EX horns had trouble with the original G1 neck, but apparently the issue was resolved fairly quickly. I'm not sure if the problem was alto, tenor, or both. I don't think there is/was an issue with the newer revisions (EXII, EXIII) Is your tenor "new" or "new to you"?
The model is 875ex//03. The seller says it's a new model. Btw the neck is E1. I鈥檝e tried my friends' 875ex alto and they all sound good, so I'm confused.....
 

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Middle register D, Eb, and E have a tendency to be sharp on my 875ex, but this has been true of my other saxes. That said, I did have a stuffy low-D at one point, and when a tech looked it over he found a few leaks along with the D tone hole needing to be leveled.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Middle register D, Eb, and E have a tendency to be sharp on my 875ex, but this has been true of my other saxes. That said, I did have a stuffy low-D at one point, and when a tech looked it over he found a few leaks along with the D tone hole needing to be leveled.
Oh sorry, I was talking about the D with octave key. So it might be your middle D. I agree with your point about the tendency of middle D, E. I meet the same thing on my alto. Just wanna ask the if middle D and E are still tend to be sharp on tenor? Or tenors have different situation... Anyway, thx for ur help, Andy.
 

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It may help to push in further and play with a lower input pitch. My Conn 12M had a very bad case of the sharp middle E and F. When I changed mouthpieces and shortened the sounding length of the instrument, the problem got much better.
 

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One thing you might try is to play E2 and F2 as harmonics first without the octave key and then by adding the octave key to see if and how much the octave vent contributes to the sharpness. On the saxophone, the body octave vent is said to be in the ideal location for the note F. Theoretically that should give that note octaves that are in tune. The farther away a note is from that ideal the sharper it becomes. In the case of the body octave vent the notes D and G# which are 3 half steps away are affected the most when the octave key is added. The neck octave is said to be in the ideal location for the note B making the A and C# go sharp in that octave.

As far as a stuffy D is concerned, opening the low C key may help. This can add sharpness to the D so it often it is becomes a compromise. FWIW the Yamaha specs give 10.6 mm as the recommended opening for the YTS 875.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
One thing you might try is to play E2 and F2 as harmonics first without the octave key and then by adding the octave key to see if and how much the octave vent contributes to the sharpness. On the saxophone, the body octave vent is said to be in the ideal location for the note F. Theoretically that should give that note octaves that are in tune. The farther away a note is from that ideal the sharper it becomes. In the case of the body octave vent the notes D and G# which are 3 half steps away are affected the most when the octave key is added. The neck octave is said to be in the ideal location for the note B making the A and C# go sharp in that octave.

As far as a stuffy D is concerned, opening the low C key may help. This can add sharpness to the D so it often it is becomes a compromise. FWIW the Yamaha specs give 10.6 mm as the recommended opening for the YTS 875.
OMG, thank you sooo much for telling me all these things. When I play E and F without octave key, they are perfectly in tune and so is the D. When I add octave key, everything goes weird... oh one more thing is that my horn is tend to be sharp on all registers. So I have to pull out my mouthpiece to where it's already shaking... My mouthpiece is vandoren tl3 and the neck is yamaha's e1. Could you please make some guesses about what's wrong? Or it's just a player's mistake... I can almost play every note in tune with adjusting myself or adding alternative keys when I play scale on my alto. Totally have no clue about why my new tenor goes like this... I am already suspecting my horn is fake馃槀
 

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OMG, thank you sooo much for telling me all these things. When I play E and F without octave key, they are perfectly in tune and so is the D. When I add octave key, everything goes weird... oh one more thing is that my horn is tend to be sharp on all registers. So I have to pull out my mouthpiece to where it's already shaking... My mouthpiece is vandoren tl3 and the neck is yamaha's e1. Could you please make some guesses about what's wrong? Or it's just a player's mistake... I can almost play every note in tune with adjusting myself or adding alternative keys when I play scale on my alto. Totally have no clue about why my new tenor goes like this... I am already suspecting my horn is fake馃槀
You might want to check your "input pitch". Playing too high an input pitch will cause your to pull the mouthpiece farther off the cork to get down to A=440. In my experience it should not be higher than a G concert on the mouthpiece alone. The mouthpiece plus neck pitch should be close to E concert---the same a F#2 on the tenor. There tends to be some disagreement about mouthpiece pitches, but the pitch of the mouthpiece plus neck is based upon a sound acoustic principle described by Benade in his book "Acoustics of Musical Instruments".
 
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