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Hey Everyone,
I was wondering if anyone knew a good link for an intonation chart that could apply to Bari. I play on an Yamaha YBS-52 if that makes any difference intonation wise. Thanks.
 

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Distinguished SOTW member/, Official SOTW Sister
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Intonaton chart? What the heck is that?

Are you talking about a FINGERING chart? All you have to do is Google, BING, Yahoo... to find one.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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There is that. With bari, it's going to be all over the map by instrument, model, vintage and setup.

I suppose one that was so inclined could start an effort to map this using the same setup across a wide variety of horns. Anyone interested?
 

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AAHHH I see! An intonation GRAPH.
Thank you my handsome piggy friend!!! :)
 

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AAHHH I see! An intonation GRAPH.
Thank you my handsome piggy friend!!! :)
:mrgreen: :snorting::snorting:

But maybe you were right maddenma. The guy may have been looking for a collection of intonation charts for different brands and models? That would make little sense though. The player's embouchure, reed and mouthpiece combo would considerably alter a given horn's intonation.

If the request is for one of these "graphs", I'd be happy to share this template I made on google doc that you can use to input data and it will draw a chart for you automatically.
 

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Here's a good one:

another victim of music school training obviously! :)


Seriously...I'm not quite sure of the method. Do you just play the note and see what comes out? Do you go chromatically? Do you "tune up" first?

Folks looking for some new/different feedback on their intonation might also find this online tuner program useful

http://sd67.bc.ca/penhimusic/Tuner Page.htm
 

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I just posted my template to google docs. To use, just click on create --> from template --> type "sax" in search box and use.

Let me know if there's anything wrong with it.

 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Seriously...I'm not quite sure of the method. Do you just play the note and see what comes out? Do you go chromatically? Do you "tune up" first?
So many reasons why this is not a foolproof aid to intonation.

  • There are different ways to determine the best mouthpiece position, which of the many notes available do you tune to? There would be a different graph for each tuning note.
  • Ideally you don't "humour" any notes, the opposite of what most saxophone players are trained to do (using their ears)
  • Playing chromatically would often give a false reading as you know what note to expect next and subconsciously adjust

I suppose by trial and error you would find out the tuning note that gives you the best average intonation, but that would then not be useful for comparing different horns or different players.

I tend to tune to G, because it's a nice note near the middle of the horn (unlike concert A on tenor or soprano) and I can play it with my left hand while I check with a piano note with my other hand (unlike with concert A on the baritone or alto).
 

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That's great.

Suggestion: add low A and high F# (or even G for those who have it), as well as the various fingerings (bis/side/1/1 Bb, Front E and F, fork F#, side C, etc.) for completeness.
 

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Here's a good one:

May be tongue in cheek but it's right.

Difficulties of doing it well aside, plotting the pitch tendencies of a horn can be good (maybe necessary) for a tech troubleshooting pitch problems in it that are to be fixed by technical means. But as a player, training your ears is the only solution. If you can hear when you're out of tune and instantly adjust, you don't need a chart. If you can't, no chart will help.
 

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I'm not quite sure of the method.
The way I understand it is you warm up and tune up to your regular tuning note, then just play a bunch or random stuff and pause on a specific note you want to chart and look at the tuner (or even better have someone read it for you). This is meant to help you determine the general intonation tendency of you, your setup and your horn. Of course, you have to adjust certain notes differently depending on what key / interval you're playing, but I think this graph can be useful to chart a "general tendency" and is no replacement for other intonation exercises.

That's great.

Suggestion: add low A and high F# (or even G for those who have it), as well as the various fingerings (bis/side/1/1 Bb, Front E and F, fork F#, side C, etc.) for completeness.
I'll see if I can incorporate these extras without cluttering it too much tonight. Extra low and high notes shouldn't be a problem (you could make a copy of the document and you use it for altissimo too) but I'm not sure how I'm going to add the alternate fingerings for the best readability.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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Here's a good one:

That is, of course, what comes out of Pete Thomas after adjusting for the oddities of his instrument. Might not necessarily reflect what the horn natively wants to do with the particular setup and player it has on it at the moment.
 
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