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Forum Contributor 2015, seeker of the knowing of t
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Arrghh... I have a test on Monday and I suck at this.

Is it normal that some are easier than others? I can get P4 (here comes the bride) P5 (twinkle Twinkle) 90% of the time, Minor 7th (west side story) 80% of the time. Minor 3rd (Georgia) is 60%. Probably the hardest one for me is major 3rd, whats up with that?

Haven't even started on descending yet.... I'll be failing the Aural class I think! :(
 

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Probably the hardest one for me is major 3rd, whats up with that?
(
I think it is for me too, that one often surprises me. If you need some tunes, then Summertime or Beethoven's 5th are good for descending. For ascending just a plain major triad arpeggio should help (Rhythming or Obladi - Oblada). Strangely I think there may be fewer tunes starting on a major 3rd.
 

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Probably the hardest one for me is major 3rd, whats up with that?
You may be too young, but do you know 'Rock around the Clock' by Bill Hailey and the Comets ?


Where he goes from "1, 2, 3 o'clock, 4 o'clock rock" to "5, 6, 7 o'clock, 8 o'clock rock".
There's your major 3rd. Then 9, 10, 11, 12 etc, completes the major triad.
A common bass line.

In fact the melody follows this typical bass pattern.

The 1st two notes of the 1st bar of It's A Raggy Waltz (Brubeck) is also a major third.
Not the two quaver pickup, but the 3rd and 4th notes of the melody line.
 

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One problem with 4rds in jazz and blues is that they are often played with varying intonation to such a degree it can sometimes be either.

e.g. Tenor Madness, the first bar is a major 3rd, bar two is a minor 3rd, though they can often sound the same if the major 3rd is a bit flat and the minor 3rd is a bit sharp, both of which are absolutely fine in that context.

Another tune with an opening major 3rd is Sentimental Journey, but again if played in a bluesy style it can be confusing, however later in that tune (bar five and six) there is a very definite contrast between major and minor 3rd
 

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While shepards watch their flocks by night .
 

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One problem with 4rds in jazz and blues is that they are often played with varying intonation to such a degree it can sometimes be either.

e.g. Tenor Madness, the first bar is a major 3rd, bar two is a minor 3rd, though they can often sound the same if the major 3rd is a bit flat and the minor 3rd is a bit sharp, both of which are absolutely fine in that context.
Pete, I think you meant to type "3rds" (not "4rds"), right?

This is very true and I often struggle when transcribing blues heads where the 3rds are ambiguous just as you say. Another example is the first note on the head of 'Night Train.' It can start as a minor 3rd and be bent upward, or vice versa.

I think one of the easiest intervals to hear is a tritone (b5th / #4th). That one is very distinctive.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, seeker of the knowing of t
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You may be too young, but do you know 'Rock around the Clock' by Bill Hailey and the Comets ?


Where he goes from "1, 2, 3 o'clock, 4 o'clock rock" to "5, 6, 7 o'clock, 8 o'clock rock".
There's your major 3rd. Then 9, 10, 11, 12 etc, completes the major triad.
A common bass line.

In fact the melody follows this typical bass pattern.

The 1st two notes of the 1st bar of It's A Raggy Waltz (Brubeck) is also a major third.
Not the two quaver pickup, but the 3rd and 4th notes of the melody line.
I'm 42, wasn't around when it came out. But do remember it from the opening credits of Happy Days!
 

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Which exam lvl are you doing, I have passed 3 and 4 AMEB and still can't do intervals. Only with a B though.
 

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I'm still kind of hacked off that the same 2 notes can be 2 different intervals depending on whether you're going up or down.

Of course, this is only because of traditional ear training methods that demand instant gut response to minimal stimuli. If you want me to recognize the function of two notes - such as an interval - play them in a context where they have a function. Don't just bang two notes and look impatient.
 

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Practice singing over a drone - this will really help with interval recognition. Instead of hearing intervals by remembering the beginnings of songs you will begin to hear them in relation to a harmonic structure - in context - in the end, this is far more effective... hearing 'Hear comes the bride" when going from the #9 to the #5 or from the b9 to the #11 is not nearly as effective or easy as learning to hear those notes over a root, that is, in their appropriate harmonic context. My 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Which exam lvl are you doing, I have passed 3 and 4 AMEB and still can't do intervals. Only with a B though.
I'm doing certificate 3 at the Adelaide conservatorium, its not an ameb exam thing... Being twice the age of the other students who pick things up twice as fast doesn't help!
 
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