Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As mentioned in my previous thread, I have a late 20s Buescher low pitch alto. This instrument was blue (heavily tarnished) when I acquired it as it had been in its case sitting in a shed for many many years. I dismantled the instrument, tore out the rotting pads, and with a small power tool (dremel) and small buffer, I cleaned it up. What I want to know now is how may this instrument be sealed to prevent it tarnishing again? Is this something the restorers will do or is there some method I may employ myself?

thanks in advance

regards

Glenn
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,888 Posts
What finish does it have, bare brass, silver plate or gold plate?

Most people dislike buffing an instrument as it can remove metal and dull the engraving so chemical stripping is often preferred. If it's silver, it will tarnish very slowly, especially if you keep it in a case. Brass will get dull and form a "patina" which many people like.

You can get it lacquered or plated, but it will diminish it's resale value, though with a 20s Buescher that is not such a big deal as it would be with some later vintage instruments. It's not something I would attempt myself, and even if you get it done professionally, some people are better than others. Here in the UK I don't know of any good lacquerers.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,268 Posts
I have four silver Buescher TrueTone saxophones (two sopranos, and alto, and a C-Mel) from early to late 1920's and none have tarnished over time. I also have a SilverKing clarinet. I've owned them for several years. On occasion, I merely go over them wearing silver mitts (treated silver-polishing cloth) or a treated polishing cloth that I bought at a department store selling silver-plated dinner ware. The horns look great. DAVE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
This 1926/7 Series III True Tone alto is brass and silver plated with a gold wash inside the bell. Brass is clearly seen at areas of heavy wear which are numerous on the body, keys and rods. On some keys where the plating is slowly eroding, this is going green and it is this that I am most concerned about. I cleaned this instrument many years ago and its holding up pretty well but I don't want it to worsen. Anyway, it's soon off for an overhaul so I will seek the advice of the technicians there who will chemically clean the thing before they start work. Having said that, the $1200 it will cost may be better put to another sax although I am rather partial to the old girl. Thanks for your comments - greatly appreciated.

Glenn
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top