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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not sure if I posted in the proper place but I picked up a H Couf Royalist... It has lots of wear to the finish and some dings it missing the curved neck but has the mouth piece.. What I'd like to know is if it's worth anything?? Did I get a good buy or is it just junk with missing that part? Here are a few pictures of it... Thanks for any help.....
 

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No expert on Couf's, but I know they have a good reputation. The horn is of the modern design (right-hand bell pads). Assuming all the pads and corks are in place, an after-market neck should work on it. It may turn out to be a fine player. DAVE
 

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These can be nice sounding horns if they are in good shape. The missing neck is one issue but from your pics it also looks like it needs pad work and the Eb key is either badly bent or, more likely, the spring has popped or is missing- the pad looks pretty bad as well. Whether it's a 'good deal" or not depends on what you paid for it and the time and expense in finding a neck that plays correctly on it and what it costs to put it in otherwise playable shape. To me it looks like a bit of a project that I wouldn't have paid much for.
 

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This is the Royalist I...the horns which were made by J. Keilwerth (thus the Germany stamp).

These are very good horns. Really good. Folks go apesh#t and are willing to spend a fortune on the Superbas, which were also JK stencils and are the top-shelf Coufs...while ignoring the Royalists entirely. Yet (although the body tubes aren't identical) there is very little difference in their sounds, The Royalist just has some simplified keywork mechanisms, mostly.

An Alto in good playing and physical shape (even if lacquer is worn) is worth about $600.

One in a non-playable condition, but complete, is worth about $250-350.

But the missing neck is a big bummer. Big.

Given that, worth maybe $150.....(am assuming it'll need some dents removed, a cleaning, and at least a handful of pads replaced).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info..... I paid $10 for it at the sale I figured it was worth more then just $10... The pads don't look bad it's missing one at the top and a lever is off (missing the screw)... If I could find a replacement neck I'd buy it and fix it up I have no clue where to find one... I was lucky to find this site...
 

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Most instrument retailers and Internet discounters can get you a neck (not necessarily a matching-brand, but one that will work), although admittedly the first one you find may not be the ideal fit (meaning both physical measurements AND tone/intonation), but most have return policies. The well-known dealers on this site include Kessler Music in Las Vegas, and I had recent contact with MacSax in Texas about after-market necks (didn't buy one from them but they were responsive). Another source would be Woodwind & Brasswind in Indiana.

If it were me, I'd make sure the horn was playable first, before getting to the neck. If the horn has leaks, etc., you wouldn't be able to tell if the neck worked or not. DAVE
 

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You could do that. There are eFlay listings for loose necks, there's a place in the midwest that sells newer asian-made replacements. Do an eBay search for "saxophone neck".

You have to get an accurate measurement on the tenon socket at the top of the horn...then you have to find a neck with an exterior tenon diameter which is w/i about .75mm of it. You need calipers to do this...a ruler won't give you an accurate enough reading. Thing is, most contemporary necks are tighter in diameter than vintage ones...so sometimes you gotta look for an older one. Then you'll still need a tech to tweak it for a perfect fit...but not a big job.

It is still a bit of a risk, though. Bore opening (at mouthpiece end), length of neck, and taper of neck all contribute to a good or bad match. If good, you can get the horn to intone within about a 10-15 cents range up and down....and that'll be pretty good. But there's also half a chance that the replacement neck will create some wildly off notes.

Let me go grab the one I have out of the closet and give you some measurements later today. You wanna get something relatively close, particularly in the length category. If you can get something of similar tenon diameter and a length w/i about 10-15mm of each other...you have a good chance of getting a decent match. The taper may be different, and the octave pip placement may be different...so the horn's tone may not be what it was with the original...but you have a decent shot at making it a good playable sax again.

Figure you can land a neck for $40-75...and if you put about $250-450 of tech work into the horn...which is pretty substantial work....you'd still have a pretty good deal.

Six of one, half dozen of the other on which comes first: get the neck, then have the horn worked up, or have the horn worked upthen get the neck (I mean, one can argue that there's little point in spending $ on the horn if you have not found a fitting neck yet).
 

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..... I paid $10 for it at the sale...
Ok, then you basically got the horn w/o neck for free. At that rate, you should do all right since you'll end up getting a good sax in good playing condition for the price of a neck and the work needed to make it playable.
 

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I agree.

BTW, the Royalist 1 takes a tenon diameter of 24mm...meaning a neck with a diameter of 23.25-24.75mm could work on it.
 
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