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Randall has played them:
4. Inderbinen.
Thomas Inderbinen is a player (pretty good!) and he is a REAL craftsman too. This is, in my humble opinion, the only person today who has this combination of factors and has worked LONG and HARD (we are talking YEARS and many prototypes and experimentations) to come up with the sax he wants to play. As luck would have it, it is also the sax I want to play!!!

I played all 3- the sop, alto, and tenor.
Horns I tried and found worthy of lust and ownership:

hehheh, heheh, heheh...like ALL of them, man!

Really though, the alto was the first horn in my life that I just couldn't put
down...it is the holy grail, it is my madonna, it is the MKVI destroying, silversonic Yani eating apollyon.
I just cannot tell you how easy and magnificent, responsive and gorgeous
sounding this alto was to play.
I WILL get one.....but it takes anywhere form 9 to 11 months after you order....
I guess I should start by pulling all those gold fillings out of my back
teeth....

The soprano...super responsive and easy, easy, to play in the upper register.
This is the first soprano I have ever played that I could play the upper register with ease and clarity. What a shock! No tongue contortions needed!
My second choice in the trio.

The tenor....I save this for 3rd, but I must also say that I own and play 5 of
the most awesone tenors on this planet, so I had a harder time deciding if this horn was "all that" simply because I need to do some a-b-c-d-e- Inderbinen testing to make a decision. The horn felt very VI-like and was VERY resonant. Like the alto, it felt alive in my hands and was very responsive. It also had a very big and pure sound...I really
liked it and felt that it would be a great horn for a veteran player...

Christoph Lauer who is probably the best German player today (mainly on tenor) has switched over to Inderbinens. You should hear him.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Jazz House - I tried that. I didn't find anyone who had actually played it, just postings on threads like, "If you could have any sax, what would it be?" If I missed it, my apologies, but please show me where it is.

Edited: Thanks, saxmusicguy.

Any others?
 

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I have.

What are they like?

That's kinda hard to describe.
Have you ever heard of Umami? It's a taste...like sweet, or sour or salty. It describes the sort of taste that's very moreish - something indefinable but quite noticeable. Parmesan cheese has lots of Umami....it's that kind of 'mmmm mmmm yumm yummm' taste.
When players on here bang on about which horn is 'the best' they nearly always end up saying something like "...and of course, it's got that 'certain something'".
The Inderbinen has that, in spades.

It also has another quality - it's very, very personal.
That's to say that it seems to shape its sound around your embouchure with such efficiency that it's almost as though it taps right into your brain and connects directly with what you think of as your 'core tone'.
This gives it a very remarkable ability.

What's really odd is that I can disagree with what Randall had to say about the tone (because I wouldn't be all that interested in a horn that was very MkVI-like) and agree with him at the same time. I had a similar agreement/disagreement with Pete Thomas, who also played the Inderbinens. We're both looking for very different things tonally, and yet we both found them in these horns.

Pete and I spoke to Thomas Inderbinen about the horns - Pete made the point that if he wanted to buy one he wouldn't be able to try it out first. Thomas replied that he doesn't make horns for anyone else - he makes them for himself. If he's happy with what he's made, then so will anyone else be.
It's an unusual but admirable philosophy - and it appears to work...very well indeed.

I suppose the bottom line is that you're asking "What do they sound like?"
The answer to that is "Whatever you want them to sound like".

Regards,
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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What I found with them is that you get a really good sense of the intonation. With many other saxophones if I blow really hard the sound seems to break up a bit and I find it hard to hear whether it's going flat or not. With the Inderbinen I hear the tone and tuning I want to play just getting louder or quieter as I want it to. I'm not saying it's a more in tune saxophone than any other, just that it's easier (for me) to play it in tune if that makes sense. I read somewhere here about cannonball saxes being in tune because they "slot". Much as I doi like cannonballs, I wouldn't want a horn that does that, ie decides for itself what is in tune!

In addition to this wonderful behaviour of the dynamics, the tone itself doesn't impose anything on you, it allows you to shape your own sound which I find some instruments, good as they are, do not allow so easily.

I would have bought one (or two) on the spot had that been an option. As it was I emailed Inderbinen to order one and I got no reply, so I presume he doesn't need to try too hard to sell them.
 

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I've tried them (sop, alto & tenor). I thought they were great. Definitely some of the best saxophones I've played. It's entirely possible someone won't like them as much as other saxophones, but objetively they are very good and nothing but personal preferance can tell you if you like them. I can't describe the tone, but ocassionally I read a description of a saxophone's tone and think "that's not what I thought at all when I've tried it" so I don't think it matters really. I just thought they were excellent with very good tone, response, etc. The ones I've tried did have a few small issues with the build quality like some slightly loose keys, adjustment issues (like double action, didn't affect sealing it seemed), but they were used in a way (in an exhibition, maybe for yaears actually, maybe demo instruments for others to try in Inderbinen's place, I don't know).
 

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I have an Inderbinen tenor sax and I can confirm most of what has been said so far. For me the biggest difference between my Inderbinen tenor and what I played before (Yani and Selmer, no vintage…) is the sound neutrality and the sound versatility of the Inderbinen tenor. The sax itself is no longer a sound impacting or sound limiting factor. Consequently you as player have a much greater responsibility for shaping the sound the way you want.

Sound is very homogeneous across all registers, so you don't hear anymore different sound characteristics when you change from lower to upper register. As I play in two different bands (one band plays rock/pop, other band plays blues) I wanted the ability to adapt the sound according to the music style. I sound always like me but with more accentuated subtleties in the sound. Consequently it's easier to play an "edgier" sound or a "rounder" sound depending on my preferences.

Nevertheless, the very big improvement for me was achieved by a combination of three different setup changes: During a period of six months I changed in three distinct steps from Yani to Inderbinen, then from Vandoren 3 Java V16 to Vandoren Red Cut 2.5 and finally from Yani metal mouthpiece 9 to PMS Guardala Studio. All three changes where equally important for my sound and my performance.

I guess that now I found my perfect setup. I can play much longer with great flexibility and easiness as I was ever able before. And as a positive side effect, the last two steps (reed and mouthpiece) even boosted my ability to play altissimo.

So, do not underestimate the other components despite the tremendous versatility and sound neutrality of the Inderbinen sax.

And last but not least, it will always be a personal experience and judgment and what is true for me is not necessarily true for others.:bluewink:
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Saxus Envious Curmudgeon
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Worth every cent.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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dear SOTW family, check out Candy Dulfer on her inderbinen alto, costing € 7'265.-.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3Fa3XfSn1I

I am more than happy with my yani A992 alto and this will be on my Wish List after I get the R&C R1 Jazz curved soprano ... ...
 

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I have.
That's kinda hard to describe.
Have you ever heard of Umami? It's a taste...like sweet, or sour or salty. It describes the sort of taste that's very moreish - something indefinable but quite noticeable. Parmesan cheese has lots of Umami....it's that kind of 'mmmm mmmm yumm yummm' taste.
Stephen, you have read "What the Dog saw"? :)

in music, we seek to express ourselves, without limitations from the equipment and this quality is "most sought after".

need to start setting aside more money in our the relentless pursuit of ourselves through music. :)
 

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Doesn't Inderbinen use Yamaha keys/mechanism?
I'm surprised Yamaha would sell to a competitor.
 

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Based on the prices quoted above, it doesn't sound like Inderbinen and Yamaha are in the same market, really. Hyundai wouldn't see Maserati as a competitor.
 
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